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Assume that I have a Products model and a Categories model.

I want to display the top products, per category, on my front page.

I am doing something like this (simplified):

# Using closure tree gem for category hierarchy
# This returns a list of category IDs, somewhat expensive call if 
# there are a lot of categories nested within "toys"
@categories = Category.find('toys').self_and_descendants
@top_toys = Products.joins(:categories).where(:categories => {:id => category_ids}}).limit(5)

I am not sure if this is the most efficient way. It seems that there would be a way of storing those category IDs which are relatively constant.

Any ideas? Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a bit more efficient:

@category_ids = Category.select(:id).find('toys').self_and_descendants.collect(&:id)
@top_toys = Products.where(:category_id => @category_ids).limit(5)

Some points:

  1. No reason to get anything other than the category ID from the category table
  2. There's no point joining to the categories table when all you're doing is using the category_id to filter Products

You could then use the Rails cache to store the @categories result if this doesn't change frequently. That could look like this

class Category < ActiveRecord::Base

  def self.ids_for_type(category_type) 
    Rails.cache.fetch "category:#{category_type}", :expires_in => 1.day do
      select(:id).find(category_type).self_and_descendants.collect(&:id)
    end
  end

  ..
end

and then

@top_toys = Products.where(:category_id => Category.ids_for_type('toys')).limit(5)

Note: The expires_in parameter to fetch is supported by memcache cache clients, but probably not by other cache providers.

share|improve this answer
    
also you should add Rails.cache.clear "category:#{category_type}" in Category#update and Category#create –  Anatoliy Kukul Dec 24 '12 at 8:23
    
I am using a join table because they have a HABTM association –  alexBrand Dec 24 '12 at 15:07
    
For HABTM, you'll need to put the Join back in, but the first query to get the category IDs will still be a little faster by only getting the IDs and not the whole category definition –  Tom Fakes Dec 24 '12 at 17:20
    
I just took a quick look at the closure tree gem code. The biggest win here will be caching the category ids from the first call, and avoid the work of pulling them from a tree structure. –  Tom Fakes Dec 24 '12 at 20:30

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