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Recently I have been asked in a discussion to write an algorithm to implement reverse of words of a sentence (Not reverse of whole sentence) without using string operations such as Split/Replace/Reverse/Join except ToCharArray and Length. The below is what I could devise in 5min of time. Though the algorithm is working fine, it seems bit ugly style of implementation. Can some body help me by polishing the code.

string ReverseWords(string s)
{
    string reverseString = string.Empty;
    string word = string.Empty;

    var chars = s.ToCharArray();
    List<ArrayList> words = new List<ArrayList>();
    ArrayList addedChars = new ArrayList();
    Char[] reversedChars = new Char[chars.Length];
    int i = 1;
    foreach (char c in chars)
    {
        if (c != ' ')
        {
            addedChars.Add(c);
        }
        else
        {
            words.Add(new ArrayList(addedChars));
            addedChars.Clear();
        }
        if (i == s.Length)
        {
            words.Add(new ArrayList(addedChars));
            addedChars.Clear();
        }
        i++;
    }
    foreach (ArrayList a in words)
    {
        for (int counter = a.Count - 1; counter >= 0; counter--)
        {
            reverseString += a[counter];
        }
        if(reverseString.Length < s.Length)
            reverseString += " ";
    }
    return reverseString;
}
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7  
Well if you avoid Split/Replace/Reverse/Join ... it is gonna be a bit ugly ! ! –  V4Vendetta Dec 24 '12 at 6:34
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is somewhat simpler:

string inp = "hai how are you?";
StringBuilder strb = new StringBuilder();
List<char> charlist = new List<char>();
for (int c = 0; c < inp.Length; c++ )
{

    if (inp[c] == ' ' || c == inp.Length - 1)
    {
        if (c == inp.Length - 1)
            charlist.Add(inp[c]);
        for (int i = charlist.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            strb.Append(charlist[i]);

        strb.Append(' ');
        charlist = new List<char>();
    }
    else
        charlist.Add(inp[c]);
}
string output = strb.ToString();
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This is what the polished version of the above algorithm which I have asked for. Thanks kovilpatti C sharper –  gee'K'iran Dec 24 '12 at 7:16
    
Here is the another BEST solution -> stackoverflow.com/questions/1009160/… –  Sandeep Aug 2 '13 at 15:53
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There is a small bug in your code. Due to this, the output string would be displayed as yo are how hi!, given the input string hi! how are you. It's truncating the last char of the last word.

Change this:

spaceEncounter.Add(words.Length - 1);

To:

spaceEncounter.Add(words.Length);
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Kind of a polished version:-

string words = "hi! how are you!";
string reversedWords = "";

List<int> spaceEncounter = new List<int>();
spaceEncounter.Add(words.Length - 1);

for (int i = words.Length - 1; i > 0; i--)
{ 
    if(words[i].Equals(' '))
    {
        spaceEncounter.Add(i);

        for (int j = i+1; j < spaceEncounter[spaceEncounter.Count - 2]; j++)
            reversedWords += words[j];

        reversedWords += " ";
    }
}

for (int i = 0; i < spaceEncounter[spaceEncounter.Count - 1]; i++)
    reversedWords += words[i];    
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Nice Example for reverse the sentences. Thanks –  vipin katiyar Jul 15 '13 at 6:22
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There is a relatively elegant solution which uses a LIFO stack.
Question however sounds like homework, so I'll only provide the pseudo code.

currWord = new LIFO stack of characters
while (! end of string/array)
{
  c = next character in string/array
  if (c == some_white_space_character) {
     while (currWord not empty) {
       c2 = currWord.pop()
       print(c2)
     }
     print(c)
  }
  else
    currWord.push(c)
}
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this seems to run in quadratic time, am i correct? –  Stan R. Mar 15 '13 at 17:38
    
@StanR. I believe you are correct. Interesting concept though. –  John Davis Jun 29 '13 at 23:38
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