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I have some problem using accessor function nth. I pass a list to some function and make new binding to an element of the list in the function with nth, then when I call the list out of the function, it is modified, and it's not what I want! What happens?

Some examples

(defun test (x) (incf x)) => TEST
(setq a 1) => 1
(test a) => 2
a => 1

I understand what's going on above, but if we change everything to lists, something happens that I can't understand

(defun test (x) (incf (nth 0 x))) => TEST
(setq a '(1)) => (1)
(test a) => 2
a => (2)

I expected a to be (1), why it has been modified? I also tried other functions like car and first, result is the same.

PS, I tried it in Lispworks and SBCL, same result.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
(defun test (x) (incf x)) => TEST
(setq a 1) => 1
(test a) => 2
a => 1

You pass 1 to test. Within test you modified the local variable x. a is not changed and can't be changed that way - we pass the value of a not a reference to a.

(defun test (x) (incf (nth 0 x))) => TEST
(setq a '(1)) => (1)
(test a) => 2
a => (2)

You pass the list (1) to test. The list is not copied. The local variable x points to the first cons cell in the list. You then modify the car of the first cons cell to 2. Since the list is not copied, you modify the passed list. a also points to the first cons cell of that list. So it is also (2).

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Thank you! That's not really functional way of dealing with lists... If I want to make everything "functional", I have to form a new list like (list (1+ (nth 0 x))) (not particularly correct, but the idea is clear), am I correct? –  TheEnt Dec 24 '12 at 10:16
    
@TheEnt: Common Lisp never copies data structures like lists, arrays, streams, conditions, CLOS objects, structures. Most Lisps don't do that. –  Rainer Joswig Dec 24 '12 at 10:19

If you don't want anything to be modified, don't use incf. Use 1+. The only reason to use incf is because you want its side-effect.

As to why this is happening, arguments are evaluated before being passed to a function. When you call test with a being 1, you are passing the value 1, which cannot be modified. When a resolves to a list, you are passing a list, which can be setf'd all over the shop, if you've chosen to use destructive functions.

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See the documentation on nth. nth returns a place that setq can then operate on.

nth may be used to specify a place to setf. Specifically, (setf (nth n list) new-object) == (setf (car (nthcdr n list)) new-object)

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Thanks, I've alreay read this. It seems I've found the reason - lists are passed by reference in CL, so that's why the original list is modified. –  TheEnt Dec 24 '12 at 10:13
    
No, lists are not passed by reference. They are passed by value like everything else. It is just that the value of a list happens to be a reference. That is a big difference. –  Svante Dec 30 '12 at 21:32

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