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I've run into a problem I have yet been unable to fix. If you look at the following: http://jsfiddle.net/WnmLc/2/

<div id="top">top</div>
<div id="bottom">
    <div id="left">left</div>
    <div id="right">
        <div id="head">head</div>
        <div id="content">content</div>
        <div id="footer">footer</div>
    </div>
</div>​

This is what I got so far:

#top
{
    height: 50px;
}
#bottom
{
    position: absolute;
    top: 50px;
    bottom: 0;
}
#left
{
    float: left;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100px;
}
#right
{  
    float: left;
    height: 100%;
}
#content
{
    height: 100%;
    overflow: auto;
}
​

I'd like #right to take all the available space to its right, and footer to be within bounds of #right, which itself should not extend beyond #bottom. #content can be of any size and should just show a scrollbar when needed, #head and #footer should be at a fixed position, ie. top/bottom of #right.

I'm afraid I'm more fluent in javascript than I am at css, so I could use some pointers here :)

thanks in advance!

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Is there any reason why you set position: absolute to #bottom? Is it because you want the height of #bottom to stretch to the page height? –  Michelle Dec 24 '12 at 9:28
    
That's correct, the entire layout should be fullscreen –  Arjan Dec 24 '12 at 9:30
    
And just checking - does #left have to be 100px? –  Michelle Dec 24 '12 at 9:44
    
I'm guessing you're thinking along the lines of proportionally dividing percentages? I would rather steer clear of that option because of different aspect ratios which could mess up the layout. –  Arjan Dec 24 '12 at 9:54
    
Yup - I updated my answer for a fixed width #left –  Michelle Dec 24 '12 at 10:03
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3 Answers

You can adjust the percentages of #left and #right. So long as they add up to 100%, this will work. The same goes for #head, #content, and #footer. I assume you want the content to be larger, so I set that to 80% for you.

#bottom {
width: 100%;
}

#left {
width: 20%;
}

#right {
width: 80%; 
}

#head, #footer {
height: 10%;
}

#content {
height: 80%;
}

See the fiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/WnmLc/4/

EDIT:

If you want to set a manual width for #left, you could fix this by making #bottom a table, and both #left and #right table cells. Then you need to wrap #right in an outer div (table) so that the content inside can be displayed as table rows. #top will have to be moved into #bottom in order to avoid overflow. However, I'd advise against using tables... They're outdated and lack support in certain browsers.

See fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/WnmLc/8/

share|improve this answer
    
I'm well aware of the table issues, but your last example comes closest to what I need, but the total size seems to extend beyond the page, also the percentages in head/footer are not an option, but I'm guessing that can be fixed using the same table magic.. –  Arjan Dec 24 '12 at 10:07
    
@Arjan - hopefully this edit fixes all the problems! jsfiddle.net/WnmLc/8 –  Michelle Dec 24 '12 at 10:17
    
Hey nice, that's very close, but there seems to be an issue with larger content: jsfiddle.net/WnmLc/9 ( I also set the head/footer to a fixed size ) –  Arjan Dec 24 '12 at 10:22
    
Hah, I was able to fix it myself using an extra div, I'm marking your suggestion as answer. Here's the final: jsfiddle.net/WnmLc/10 –  Arjan Dec 24 '12 at 10:41
    
As it turned out, there where some issues with this method, see my own answer for a css version without tables. –  Arjan Dec 24 '12 at 12:34
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Hi i used this code on fiddle u can also try it there

    div
{
    border: 1px solid red;
}
#top
{
    height: 50px;
}
#bottom
{
    position: absolute;
    top: 50px;
    width:100%;
    bottom: 0;
}
#left
{
    float: left;
    height: 100%;
    width: 10%;
}
#right
{  
    float: left;
    width:89%;
    height: 100%;

}
#content
{
    height: 87%;    
    overflow: auto;
}
​
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Even though the table option as suggested by Michelle worked fine in the fiddle, it turned out that there where some serious issues regarding column-span when data was entered in the #top section.

I managed to get it to work using css without table-style code, you can find an example here: http://jsfiddle.net/WnmLc/11/

html:

<div id="top">top</div>
<div id="left">left</div>
<div id="head">head</div>
<div id="content">
    <div id="scroll">content</div>
</div>
<div id="footer">footer</div>

css:

div
{
    position: absolute;
    box-shadow: inset 0 0px 3px red;
}
#top
{
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
    right: 0;
    height: 50pt;
}
#left
{
    left: 0;
    top: 50pt;
    width: 100pt;
    bottom: 0;
}
#head, #footer
{
    height: 12pt;
}
#head
{
    top: 50pt;
    left: 100pt;
    right: 0;
}
#footer
{
    bottom: 0;
    left: 100pt;
    right: 0;
}
#content
{
    top: 62pt;
    left: 100pt;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 12pt;
}
#scroll
{
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    overflow: auto;
}
​
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