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I have a file "Reference.txt" in a location(currently in C:\dropbox),I am trying to open it from this location and get its contents,the contents of "Reference.txt" is just one word like "E4567ABCDE16220.1",i need to get this data using following,can anyone provide inputs on how can this be done?

file="Reference.txt" 
pL="ab1234"

def location(file,pL):
    if pL is 'ab1234':
        file = open('C:\dropbox\' + file,'r')
        print file
    else:
        file = open('C:\dropbox\' + pL + file,'r')

def main ():
    data=location(file,pL)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, Bakuriu, PearsonArtPhoto, dcastro, Blastfurnace Mar 3 '14 at 0:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
you need to read up on escape sequences – inspectorG4dget Dec 24 '12 at 9:58
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Do not use is to test for equality; use == instead. is tests for object identity, which is a whole different kettle of fish.

Use the os.path.join() function to construct paths. And use r'' raw strings for paths containing \ backslashes, double the \ backslashes to \\ or use forward slashes instead (/), \' in a python string means "insert a literal ' character in the string here", which doesn't work when what you really wanted was to close the string instead.

import os.path

def location(filename, pL):
    if pL == 'ab1234':
        filename = os.path.join(r'C:\dropbox', filename)
    else:
        filename = os.path.join(r'C:\dropbox', pL, filename)
    with open(filename, 'r') as f:
        return f.read()

open() only opens the file, to get the data out you also need to call .read() on the open file. Since file is already a built-in name, it's best not to use that as a variable, so I've renamed it in the above code. Last, but not least, by using a with construct the fileobject will be closed automatically when we have read the data and return it from the function.

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Your problems stem from how you open the file in C:\Dropbox\. When you use a \, it acts as an escape character to escape the next character from its literal meaning. Thus, if you wanted to make a string using double quotes, which itself contained double quotes, you'll need to escape all double quotes inside the string.
For example:

Suppose you want to hold inside a variable, the string Alice told Bob "Mallory knows what we're up to".
If you were to put that in a string as follows:

myStr = "Alice told Bob "Mallory knows what we're up to""

Then Python considers "Alice told Bob " to be one string and then doesn't know what Mallory knows what we're up to is doing there. Therefore, the interpreter will complain.

In order to capture the notion that the double quotes are part of the string itself, you should escape them as follows:

myStr = "Alice told Bob \"Mallory knows what we're up to\""

But what happens if you want a \ as part of your string?
Then you'll need to escape the \ with another \:

myStr = "this is a backslash: \\"

So when you try to open "C:\Dropbox\somefile", python interprets that as having two escape sequences: \D and \s, substitutes the value of those escape sequences in that string and tries open the resultant filename, which doesn't exist in your filesystem. To properly escape this, you should do:

myfile = open("C:\\Dropbox\\somefile.txt")

However, this can get difficult to read, sometimes. Therefore, you may want to use raw strings (prefixed with r). Raw strings won't replace escape sequences in the string:

myfile = open(r"C:\Dropbox\somefile.txt")

Thus, r"C:\Dropbox\somefile.txt" is equivalent to "C:\\Dropbox\\somefile.txt"

One more comment on what you're doing: you should really use os.path.join when joining parts of a filepath together. Whereas you would do

 myfile = open('C:\\dropbox\\' + pL + file,'r')

you should really do

 myfile = open(os.path.join("C:\\dropbox", pL, filename),'r')

One last note:
Don't name your variables file or str or list or really any other builtin type - this will mess with the behavior of the interpreter and produce unwanted results down the road

share|improve this answer

You need to read the content of the file you can do this like this:

file="Reference.txt" 
pL="ab1234"

def location(file,pL):
    if pL == 'ab1234':
        file = open('C:\dropbox\' + file,'r')
    else:
        file = open('C:\dropbox\' + pL + file,'r')

    return file.readlines()

def main ():
    data=location(file,pL)
    print data

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

To read the content of the file you can use read() , readline() , readlines() on the file object depending upon your need.Google should help you with that

share|improve this answer

Following fixed the issue

import os.path

def location(filename, pL):
    if pL == 'ab1234':
        filename = os.path.join(r'C:\dropbox', filename)
    else:
        filename = os.path.join(r'C:\dropbox', pL, filename)
    with open(filename, 'r') as f:
        return f.read()
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