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Should prepare and bindParam statements be put in the try{} block when trying to catch exceptions. Can prepare and bindParam cause/generate/whatever-the-proper-term-is exceptions?

Right now I'm putting only execute() in the try{}, I don't know if that's the proper way of doing things.

So, should I do:

$s = $dbh->prepare("select * from products where id=:p_id");
$s->bindParam(":p_id",$p_id,PDO::PARAM_INT);
try {
    $s->execute();
} catch (PDOException $e) {
    log_error("MySQL error: ".$e->getMessage());
}

or

try {
    $s = $dbh->prepare("select * from products where id=:p_id");
    $s->bindParam(":p_id",$p_id,PDO::PARAM_INT);
    $s->execute();
} catch (PDOException $e) {
    log_error("MySQL error: ".$e->getMessage());
}
share|improve this question
    
You should your queries so there wouldn't be such executions at all. – jolt Dec 24 '12 at 10:12
1  
I didn't understand that. Could you please elaborate? – L84 Dec 24 '12 at 10:13
1  
PDO will only throw exceptions if you tell it to by setting PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE - if you didn't do that, the only thing that can possible throw an exception is PDO::__construct() – DaveRandom Dec 24 '12 at 10:14
    
@L84 Edit your question to explain the problem with a small piece of code. That would help everyone looking at your question. See How to Ask? – mtk Dec 24 '12 at 10:14
1  
@L84 If you have PDO set to throw exceptions, anything that can trigger an error will throw in an error condition. So the short answer to your question is "yes". – DaveRandom Dec 24 '12 at 10:16
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Normally it shouldn't be used in the application code at all.

Many sketch codes that uses try.. catch are just sketches, to show some idea. And shouldn't be copied as is.

There should be an application-wide exception handler which is responsible for catching all the exceptions and take appropriate action (log the error message and throw 503 HTTP error normally).

share|improve this answer
    
+1, but you seem to be suggesting that you would allow all exceptions to bubble right up to a global error handler, which in turn suggests that one would always want to break out of the current execution scope on any error (i.e. no error is recoverable). Or did I misread? – DaveRandom Dec 24 '12 at 10:21
    
wouldn't that stop the execution of the entire script? because that's precisely what I don't want to happen, just a cute little error message starting with 'Oops' – L84 Dec 24 '12 at 10:27

The thing about try - you should put things there that can throw an exception.
What i've seen - is putting all statements connected to execute/... into this block, it's esy to get misled what can throw exception...

share|improve this answer

I argue having a try/catch clause for the sake of catching exceptions raised by any statement that might throw is the world upside down. Instead, what you want, is to explicitly provide a fallback mechanism for statements of which you beforehand know that an exception might occur from which you can recover.

You can choose to write down the exception in a log file and continue the path of execution however this is asking for trouble (if not under test, it will be after release) since this leaves the session in an undefined state. In the example given you do just that, you write down something in the log file after which you act like the world hasn't changed a bit. Now what if the query itself was trying to insert a financial record which you're now missing without obviously knowing about it?

share|improve this answer
    
Well the script would definitely know something went wrong (I could put like $selecterror = true; in the catch{} block and later test for it and whatnot. I definitely don't want to break the user experience just because there was a temporary problem with the server. – L84 Dec 24 '12 at 10:32
    
The problem of course is that the user experience might already be broken. You're setting yourself up for an impossible task here. What i'm really trying to say is that you need to know beforehand what exceptions what statement can throw before you decide to implement a catch block. In your case, 2 exceptions that might be thrown are that the server is not available or that the input is invalid. Have you though about both? have you though about all the other exceptions? Can you trust the results of previous queries even during all possible conditions? etc etc etc – Polity Dec 24 '12 at 10:37
    
Ok, but how would I be sure beyond the shadow of doubt if I know what exceptions which statement can throw? I can test all I want, something can still squeak through. – L84 Dec 24 '12 at 10:50
    
L84 You can do your best but you simply cant know them all. Thats why you should not catch only in those rare cases where you have a plan for the case when a certain statement throws a certain exception. Read the documentation and protect only those statements for which you really have a plan for a certain exception. Finally, ensure that you catch the right exception and that the exception is what you expected it to be. – Polity Dec 24 '12 at 11:01

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