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I have a Json string, similar to the following:

{
   EventID: 4,
   CalendarEntry : 
   {
      CalendarID: 4,
      AreaID: 41,
      Name: "My Event Entry #4"
   }
}

I deserialize the top-level structure into an Event entity in code, which correctly adds (4) to Id:

public class Event
{
    [DataMember(Name = "EventID")]
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

However, when I add Calendar as a property to Event, the two Id's always return null?

public class EventCalendar
{
    [DataMember(Name = "CalendarID")]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [DataMember(Name = "AreaID")]
    public int AreaId { get; set; }

    [DataMember(Name = "Name")]
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Event
{
    [DataMember(Name = "EventID")]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [DataMember(Name = "CalendarEntry")]
    public EventCalendar Calendar { get; set; }
}

What bugs me is that if I remove the [DataMember] attribute from either Id or AreaId, and give it the name exactly as it comes from my JSON string, it brings back the correct results. I don't want to, however, use the same names in my entities and would have expected [DataMember] to correctly bring back the data?

I'm using JsonSerializer in .Net 4.5.

I have also tried this with Newtonsoft.Json and it does the same thing?

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2 Answers 2

{
   EventID: 4,
   CalendarEntry : 
   {
      CalendarID: 4,
      AreaID: 41,
      Name: "My Event Entry #4"
   }
}

maybe :-?

{
   EventID: 4,
   CalendarEntry : 
   [{
      CalendarID: 4,
      AreaID: 41,
      Name: "My Event Entry #4"
   }]
}
share|improve this answer

This is working fine for me. Verify that your input JSON-string is valid. In this example I am using System.Web.Script.Serialization and System.Runtime.Serialization

public static void Main (string[] args)
{
        JavaScriptSerializer ser = new JavaScriptSerializer();          
        string json = ser.Serialize(new Event { 
            Id =  4,
            Calendar = new EventCalendar {
                Id = 5,
                AreaId = 55,
                Name = "Some name"
            }
        });

        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("json  = {0}", json));
        Event fromJsonEvent = ser.Deserialize<Event>(json);

        Console.WriteLine(string.Format ("Event.Id = {0}", fromJsonEvent.Id));
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format ("Event.EventCalendar.Name = {0}", fromJsonEvent.Calendar.Name));
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format ("Event.EventCalendar.Id = {0}", fromJsonEvent.Calendar.Id));
    }
}

public class EventCalendar
{
    [DataMember(Name = "CalendarID")]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [DataMember(Name = "AreaID")]
    public int AreaId { get; set; }

    [DataMember(Name = "Name")]
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Event
{
    [DataMember(Name = "EventID")]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [DataMember(Name = "CalendarEntry")]
    public EventCalendar Calendar { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i'm assuming its the data from the service i need to work with, which i dont have control over (from 3rd party). the JSON parses correctly and the developer does indeed return int on all ids. just weird that neither json.net nor built in serialization would infer the object properties correctly? –  JadedEric Dec 24 '12 at 12:54
    
How does the json string look (from the third party service) ? –  nekman Dec 24 '12 at 14:29

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