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How can I round up values like this:

1.001 => 2
3.3 => 4

Means if the number has fractional part than i want the smallest integer number greater than the number ?

I used Math.Ceiling() but is not helping. How can i do this ?

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closed as not a real question by andand, Mario, t0mm13b, Tim Schmelter, dreamcrash Dec 24 '12 at 22:21

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
in what way is Math.Ceiling not working? It should do as you're asking.. –  Rich S Dec 24 '12 at 12:52
    
Math.Ceiling is a sharp solution, how are you trying to handle the output –  hakiko Dec 24 '12 at 12:54
3  
You need to include code and output instead of pseudo numbers and arrows –  bryanmac Dec 24 '12 at 12:55
    
Looking at the answers below, which are actually comments to this Question, Math.Ceiling should work pefectly, in case you are using c# :) –  palaѕн Dec 24 '12 at 12:58
    
Remember that the type holding your number (called System.Double or just double) is an immutable type. That means the Ceiling method can't modify its argument (it is not a ref parameter). Therefore, doing Math.Ceiling(x); as a statement doesn't change x. You have to reassign, like x = Math.Ceiling(x); You can also introduce a new variable of course, var y = Math.Ceiling(x);. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 25 '12 at 0:02

4 Answers 4

Math.Ceiling will work. can you tell what its not working ? in term of any errors or returned result.

var returnVal=Math.Ceiling(yourValue);
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Use Math.Ceiling() method.

Returns the smallest integer greater than or equal to the specified number.

    var i = Math.Ceiling(1.001);
    var j = Math.Ceiling(3.3);

    Console.WriteLine(i);
    Console.WriteLine(j);

Output:

2

4

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Math.Ceiling(value);

Should work.

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double x;
x = Math.Ceiling(5.2)   ;//Result; 6
x = Math.Ceiling(5.7)   ;//Result; 6
x = Math.Ceiling(-5.2)  ;//Result;-5
x = Math.Ceiling(-5.7)  ;//Result;-5

This is a simple example. How can't you use it? Maybe you miss to assign a variable to

Math.Ceiling();
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