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I'm trying to understand the different ways of passing references to pointers around. One implementation involves passing a pointer reference and the other involves passing the pointer.

I'm trying to understand how "*&" is being parsed in C++ in the latter.

Say I want to change what a pointer P points to. I can either pass the pointer or the reference to the pointer. If I pass a reference to the pointer my implementation would go something like this

void changePointer(int ** pp){

    //stuff that changes P from main();

}

//...

int main(){

    int a = 7;
    int * P = &a;
    changePointer(&P);
    return 0;

}

above, the parameter in changePointer is being parsed as:

void changePointer(int ** pp){
//int ** pp = &P; //where P is the integer pointer being passed by main
...

however if I wanted to pass the pointer, not its reference, then in main I would say:

//...
changePointer(P);
//...

and in changePointer I would change the parameter to:

void changePointer(int *& pp)

Now I have no clue how this is working or how to read this. Is this being parsed as:

int * pp = &P?

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1  
Seems like you're confused about what a reference to a pointer is. In C++, a reference is a specific kind of type. For example, int*& is a "reference to pointer to int". It can be confusing because C programmers use the phrase "pass X by reference" to mean "pass a pointer to X by value". But when a C++ programmer says "pass by reference" they're talking about a reference type. The & in the type has nothing to do with the & operator that gets the address of an object. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 24 '12 at 13:34
    
I'm just now reading this. Had no idea this existed haha. I'm a CS student so that's probably why there was some ambiguity. So when I say int * a = &X; &X is some hex value that is passed to a. If I say int & A = a; then A is an integer reference who's value is A? –  thed0ctor Dec 24 '12 at 13:41
1  
A is an reference to the integer object denoted by a. Doing something to A will do it to a. You can think of it is as giving a new name to a. Now A and a refer to the same thing. (Also, &X isn't a "hex value", it's the address of X - we just often represent memory addresses with hex because it's easy to read) –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 24 '12 at 13:46
    
Are reference types are specific to C++? Or do they exist in C as well? –  thed0ctor Dec 24 '12 at 13:52
1  
They exist in C++, but not C. :) –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 24 '12 at 13:57
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is passing the pointer by reference just as any other object. Read the syntax from right to left: reference to a pointer. It would be the same as doing int *&pp = P just as it would be the same as doing int &j = i for simple integers.

void f(int *& ptr) {
    // f(pointer) is the same as
       int *& ptr = pointer
}

The way you create the argument is the same way it will be parsed; you're just creating a variable in the parameter that will be equal to the argument you pass to it. And references work the same way inside the function as they do outside. For example:

int main() {

    int a = 7,
        b = 5,
       *P = &a; // *P == 7

    int *&pp = P;

    pp = b; // *P == 5

}
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This

void changePointer(int ** pp)

doesn't pass a pointer by reference - it passes a pointer to a pointer by value.

This

void changePointer(int *& pp)

passes a pointer by reference - changing the pointer inside the function will change the pointer itself outside.

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I assume OP means reference in the more general terminology, which is very confusing. –  Pubby Dec 24 '12 at 13:03
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int * & pp

is pronounced "pp is a reference to pointer to int". It means that the pointer argument is passed by reference meaning that any changes applied to it in the function will be reflected in the passed object, not its copy.

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int*& is a reference (&) to a pointer (*) to int.

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It is parsed as (int *) (&) (pp).

The int * is just what it is, a pointer to integer. The & means "a reference to", and pp is the name of the variable.

What the compiler does when it has a reference parameter is to actually pass the address of the variable [or something that is similar to an address - this is implementation details in the compiler]. So ultimately, the compiler does exactly the same thing as &P in your first code-snippet - the only difference is that you can't be an idiot and pass a NULL to the function and thus cause the system to potentially crash.

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(int *) (&) (pp) doesn't make any sense. Parens can only be added like this: int (*&pp). –  Pubby Dec 24 '12 at 13:06
1  
The intention of the parenthesis was to group the elements, not as a display of syntax in C. I hope that makes sense. –  Mats Petersson Dec 24 '12 at 13:08
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