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interface Bouncable{ } 
interface Colorable extends Bouncable{ } 
class Super implements Colorable{ } 
class Sub extends Super implements Colorable {} // Ok (case -1)

But,

class Sub implements Colorable extends Super {} // error (case -2)

Why case-2 showing compilation error { expected. Why ?? Although, case-1 executes without error.

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possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/10538010/… –  yegor256 Dec 24 '12 at 13:14
    
@yegor256 may be. But,you can say, it belongs to the second part of my question –  jWeaver Dec 24 '12 at 13:18
    
i don't know, why people doing downvote without writing their reason. If anyone have doubts, they will ask, on the other hand, if other knows that answer, then post their answer instead of doing downvote. People are mis-using the down-vote features of SO. –  jWeaver Dec 24 '12 at 14:59
    
And, i really don't think so, it was really irrelevant question. As, a beginner, many people don't about this. –  jWeaver Dec 24 '12 at 15:06
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

extends should go before implements:

class Sub extends Super implements Colorable {}
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1  
why ?? any logic behind that ?? –  jWeaver Dec 24 '12 at 13:08
2  
just Java syntax, no logic –  yegor256 Dec 24 '12 at 13:08
    
then, also i believe, there would be any logic for this Syntax. If you know that, then please explain. I will appreciate. –  jWeaver Dec 24 '12 at 13:09
1  
There have to be some rules. Why can't { and [ be interchanged? Why cant ( and ) be interchanged? Same reason. –  Osiris Dec 24 '12 at 13:11
1  
If you found any supportive comments in JLS or any where. Please do share. –  jWeaver Dec 24 '12 at 13:12
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This is because of a specification in JLS. And there is a certain order of elements when you attempt to declare a class in Java:

  • Modifiers such as public, private, etc.
  • The class name, with the initial letter capitalized by convention.
  • The name of the class's parent (superclass), if any, preceded by the keyword extends. A class can only extend (subclass) one parent.
  • A comma-separated list of interfaces implemented by the class, if any, preceded by the keyword implements. A class can implement more than one interface.
  • The class body, surrounded by braces, { }.

Reference:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/classdecl.html

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You explained about the basic declaration in java. But, from your explanation and the link, it is not clear why extend come first than implements. –  jWeaver Dec 24 '12 at 13:21
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The syntax for class definition at JLS Syntax Page is

NormalClassDeclaration: 
    class Identifier [TypeParameters] [extends Type] [implements TypeList] ClassBody

I think that for simplifying the syntax rules they did not make it interchangeable.

For making interchangeable you probably need something like:

NormalClassDeclaration: 
    class Identifier [TypeParameters] [ExtendsImplements] ClassBody

ExtendsImplements:
    [extends Type] [implements TypeList] | [implements TypeList] [extends Type]

Or even worst, you might beed to declare Extends and Implements in order to use OR.

I guess it is not that important that it will worth cluttering the parsing rules.

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Any reference ?? –  jWeaver Dec 24 '12 at 13:23
    
added reference to JLS Syntax Page –  Aviram Segal Dec 24 '12 at 13:24
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You have to do like this. You can extends only one class but you can implement multiple interfaces by comma separately. it would be more reader friendly to have the extend first before the implement

class Sub extends Super implements Colorable
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i don't think so, it will reason behind this syntax :/ Please give some reference. –  jWeaver Dec 24 '12 at 13:29
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