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When i run this script:

#!/bin/bash
#This script distributes file/folders to all POP servers within the production environment.
echo "Are you willing to transfer a file or a directory? [Answer: file/dir]"
read answer
echo "Please enter a file name or a full path to the files/directories you want to distribute"
read locfile
echo "Please enter the destination path"
read destfile
if [-n $answer] then
        case "$answer" in
                file)
                        for srv in `cat ~/srv.lst`;
                        do echo "$srv:";
                        /usr/bin/scp $locfile $srv:$destfile;
                        done
                ;;
                dir)
                        for srv in `cat ~/srv.lst`;
                        do echo "$srv:";
                        /usr/bin/scp -r $locfile $srv:$destfile;
                        done
                ;;
                *)
                echo "Please check your input"
esac
fi

I get this output:

./distribute_files: line 26: syntax error near unexpected token `fi'
./distribute_files: line 26: `fi'

I've tried with or without else but i can't seem to find the problem. Thanks

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I rewrote your script using bash idioms:

#!/bin/bash

#This script distributes file/folders to all POP servers within the production environment.

echo "Are you willing to transfer a file or a directory? [Answer: file/dir]"
read -r answer
echo "Please enter a file name or a full path to the files/directories you want to distribute"
read -r locfile
echo "Please enter the destination path"
read -r destfile

if [[ -n "$answer" ]] then
    case "$answer" in
        file)
            while read -r srv; do
                [[ -n "$srv" ]] || continue
                echo "$srv:"
                /usr/bin/scp -- "$locfile" "$srv:$destfile"
            done < ~/srv.lst
            ;;
        dir)
            while read -r srv; do
                [[ -n "$srv" ]] || continue
                echo "$srv:"
                /usr/bin/scp -r -- "$locfile" "$srv:$destfile"
            done < ~/srv.lst
            ;;
        *)
            echo "Please check your input"
            ;;
    esac
fi

What has changed? More quotings (your script would have broke sooner or later when a filename contains a space) and use of [[...]] instead of deprecated and less robust (in bash) [...]. I also used read with the -r option (as to not allow backslashes to escape any characters). I also changed the

for svr in `cat ~/srv.lst`; do

into the more mature

while read -r srv; do
    ...
done < ~/src.lst

(it's really considered very bad bash practice to loop over a cat as you did). I had to include a guard [[ -n "$srv" ]] to ignore empty lines. Here you could add something more sophisticated if want to handle comments...

I also added -- to scp, just in case a file $locfile starts with a hyphen. That would confuse scp (it would think it's an option). That's considered very good shell practice.

I thought I would do so, as you mention production environment. (I'm often scared to see the scripts that are used in production).

In fact, your problem was about the [...] which is not needed here, as you can safely include it into the case as:

#!/bin/bash

#This script distributes file/folders to all POP servers within the production environment.

echo "Are you willing to transfer a file or a directory? [Answer: file/dir]"
read -r answer
echo "Please enter a file name or a full path to the files/directories you want to distribute"
read -r locfile
echo "Please enter the destination path"
read -r destfile

case "$answer" in
    "")
        true
        # Do whatever you like here
        ;;
    file)
        while read -r srv; do
            [[ -n "$srv" ]] || continue
            echo "$srv:"
            /usr/bin/scp -- "$locfile" "$srv:$destfile"
        done < ~/srv.lst
        ;;
    dir)
        while read -r srv; do
            [[ -n "$srv" ]] || continue
            echo "$srv:"
            /usr/bin/scp -r -- "$locfile" "$srv:$destfile"
        done < ~/srv.lst
        ;;
    *)
        echo "Please check your input"
        ;;
esac

Also, an "interactive" script like yours is considered bad practice (is this reminiscent of the old BASIC programs on older family computers?). You should instead consider using arguments to your script (exercise left to the reader).

You could get rid altogether of the dir v.s. file thing, by testing whether $locfile is a dir or not. And get rid of the echo that tells which file it's scping by using the -v (verbose) option:

#!/bin/bash

#This script distributes file/folders to all POP servers within the production environment.

read -r -p "Please enter a file name or a full path to the files/directories you want to distribute" locfile
read -r -p "Please enter the destination path" destfile

ropt=""
if [[ -d "$locfile" ]]; then
    ropt='r'
fi

while read -r srv; do
    [[ -n "$srv" ]] && /usr/bin/scp -v$ropt -- "$locfile" "$srv:$destfile"
done < ~/srv.lst

In fact, the more I look at what your script does, the more I think it's much faster for a user to type in a terminal:

$ while read -r srv; do [[ -n "$srv" ]] && /usr/bin/scp -v "myfile" "$srv:mydestfile"; done < ~/srv.lst

(because she'll be able to use file name completion with tabs), rather than to invoke your script.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Well, first of all thanks for all your feedback, it's much appreciated and i look forward to change my script tomorrow at work. Second, it all started from writing it all in a one line without even the need for the script but at the moment, no one from my team knows Linux and this is just to make things easier for them in case i'm not available. Anyways, Thanks a lot for all this information! –  Itai Ganot Dec 25 '12 at 0:17

Instead of

if [-n $answer] then

try

if [ -n $answer ]
then

That is, use spaces in the brackets, and put the then on a different line.

share|improve this answer
    
that solved the issue, can you please tell me the difference? –  Itai Ganot Dec 24 '12 at 14:01
    
@ItaiGanot The spaces are to designate a conditional statement in bash. Also, an if line must terminate before the then, so either use a semicolon or place the then of a separate line. Both of these are just quirks in the shell. –  chrisaycock Dec 24 '12 at 14:06
    
@ItaiGanot There're no quirks in the shell. When you write if [-n $answer] then, bash will try to execute the command [-n with arguments (the expansion of) $answer and then, which is not what you want. Instead you want if [ -n "$answer" ]; then. But see my answer for further (good) options. –  gniourf_gniourf Dec 24 '12 at 14:57

Instead of:

if [-n $answer] then

Use white space after '[' and before ']'. If you want to use 'then' in the same line use ;:

if [ -n $answer ]; then

Or:

if [ -n "$answer" ]
then
share|improve this answer

Besides that, always quote your shell variable in test -n, so use if [ -n "$answer" ]; then instead.

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[ is a command so you need to respect the whitespace:

if [ -n $answer ]; then

Just like cat-n file or echo-e foo isn't valid.

$ which [
/usr/bin/[
share|improve this answer
    
which [ isn't relevant here, since (in bash), [ is a builtin as you can quickly check with type [. –  gniourf_gniourf Dec 24 '12 at 14:22
1  
Well, even built-ins are commands, aren't they? It's a good thing to point out that [ is not syntactic sugar, but like any other command or built-in. –  Jens Dec 25 '12 at 20:03

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