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I just write a simple program to learn c programming

  1 #include<stdio.h>
  2 
  3 int main()
  4 {
  5         int a = 5;
  6         switch(a)
  7         {
  8                 case 0:
  9                         {
 10                         ;
 11                         int a = 10;
 12                         printf("%d\n",a);
 13                         break;
 14                         }
 15                 default :
 16                         printf("%d",a);
 17 
 18         }
 19         return 0;
 20 }

Output: 5 When I forgot the brace it turns to be:

  8                 case 0:
  9                        
 10                         ;
 11                         int a = 10;
 12                         printf("%d\n",a);
 13                         break;
 14                         

Output: 0

I'm little confused about this and try to compile and debug:


-   1    0x000000000040051c <+0>:     push   %rbp                          |-   1    0x000000000040051c <+0>:     push   %rbp
|   2    0x000000000040051d <+1>:     mov    %rsp,%rbp                     ||   2    0x000000000040051d <+1>:     mov    %rsp,%rbp
|   3    0x0000000000400520 <+4>:     sub    $0x10,%rsp                    ||   3    0x0000000000400520 <+4>:     sub    $0x10,%rsp
|   4 => 0x0000000000400524 <+8>:     movl   $0x5,-0x8(%rbp)               ||   4 => 0x0000000000400524 <+8>:     movl   $0x5,-0x8(%rbp)
|   5    0x000000000040052b <+15>:    mov    -0x8(%rbp),%eax               ||   5    0x000000000040052b <+15>:    mov    -0x8(%rbp),%eax
|   6    0x000000000040052e <+18>:    test   %eax,%eax                     ||   6    0x000000000040052e <+18>:    test   %eax,%eax
|   7    0x0000000000400530 <+20>:    jne    0x40054f <main+51>            ||   7    0x0000000000400530 <+20>:    jne    0x40054f <main+51>
|   8    0x0000000000400532 <+22>:    movl   $0xa,-0x4(%rbp)               ||   8    0x0000000000400532 <+22>:    movl   $0xa,-0x4(%rbp)
    9    0x0000000000400539 <+29>:    mov    -0x4(%rbp),%eax               |    9    0x0000000000400539 <+29>:    mov    -0x4(%rbp),%eax
   10    0x000000000040053c <+32>:    mov    %eax,%esi                     |   10    0x000000000040053c <+32>:    mov    %eax,%esi
   11    0x000000000040053e <+34>:    mov    $0x400614,%edi                |   11    0x000000000040053e <+34>:    mov    $0x400614,%edi
   12    0x0000000000400543 <+39>:    mov    $0x0,%eax                     |   12    0x0000000000400543 <+39>:    mov    $0x0,%eax
   13    0x0000000000400548 <+44>:    callq  0x4003f0 <printf@plt>         |   13    0x0000000000400548 <+44>:    callq  0x4003f0 <printf@plt>
   14    0x000000000040054d <+49>:    jmp    0x400563 <main+71>            |   14    0x000000000040054d <+49>:    jmp    0x400563 <main+71>
   15    0x000000000040054f <+51>:    mov    -0x8(%rbp),%eax               |   15    0x000000000040054f <+51>:    mov    -0x4(%rbp),%eax              
   16    0x0000000000400552 <+54>:    mov    %eax,%esi                     |   16    0x0000000000400552 <+54>:    mov    %eax,%esi
   17    0x0000000000400554 <+56>:    mov    $0x400618,%edi                |   17    0x0000000000400554 <+56>:    mov    $0x400618,%edi
   18    0x0000000000400559 <+61>:    mov    $0x0,%eax                     |   18    0x0000000000400559 <+61>:    mov    $0x0,%eax
   19    0x000000000040055e <+66>:    callq  0x4003f0 <printf@plt>         |   19    0x000000000040055e <+66>:    callq  0x4003f0 <printf@plt>
   20    0x0000000000400563 <+71>:    mov    $0x0,%eax                     |   20    0x0000000000400563 <+71>:    mov    $0x0,%eax
   21    0x0000000000400568 <+76>:    leaveq                               |   21    0x0000000000400568 <+76>:    leaveq 
+  22 +--  2 lines: 0x0000000000400569 <+77>: retq   ----------------------|+  22 +--  2 lines: 0x0000000000400569 <+77>: retq   ---------------------

A little diffrent but vital:

$ diff with.txt without.txt 
15c15
<    0x000000000040054f <+51>:  mov    -0x8(%rbp),%eax
---
>    0x000000000040054f <+51>:  mov    -0x4(%rbp),%eax

Thanks in advanced.


UPDATE: I learn a lesson that gcc -Wall is always a good practice

share|improve this question
    
The version without the braces doesn't compile. It's not valid C. And the first version doesn't have the output that you claim. I've no idea why you bother with assembly here. Get rid of it and show us the real code. You need to slow down and get a grip on what you are doing. If you can't even manage to post the code that you are running, how can you hope to understand the program. Also, your main is wrong. You mean int main(void). –  David Heffernan Dec 24 '12 at 14:15
    
@DavidHeffernan gcc is compile this code without complaining unless you set -Wall which is gives you "warning: 'a' may be used uninitialized in this function [-Wuninitialized]". –  Sergey Dec 24 '12 at 14:20
    
@sergey Not the second version with no braces. At least not for me. –  David Heffernan Dec 24 '12 at 14:23
    
@DavidHeffernan we are talking about gcc, not g++ –  Sergey Dec 24 '12 at 14:24
    
@DavidHeffernan here the log "C:\WORK\nuwen\MinGW>gcc -Wall -std=c99 a.c a.c: In function 'main': a.c:14:19: warning: 'a' may be used uninitialized in this function [-Wuninitialized] C:\WORK\nuwen\MinGW>g++ a.c a.c: In function 'int main(int, const char**)': a.c:13:13: error: jump to case label [-fpermissive] a.c:10:17: error: crosses initialization of 'int a' C:\WORK\nuwen\MinGW>" –  Sergey Dec 24 '12 at 14:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

So you have to really work at getting to this point, as it won't compile without the extra semicolon in your code. Which makes me think this is contrived example made up for an interview or some such.

In your second example, the variable a (inner) is created at the switch braces { }, but it is not initialized at that level, since the initialization is only in the case 0: code. So the value of a is completely random (happens to be zero)

Either way, bad coding style! Don't forget to use braces in case-statements if you introduce variables. [In g++ you actually get an error "jump to case-label crosses initialization of 'int a']

So, first of all, gcc -Wall will give a warning for "uninitalized variable".

If we consider this example:

int a = 111;

int main()
{
    int a = 2;

    printf("a=%d\n", a);
}

I don't think anyone would argue the case of "which a do we mean", right?

Or if we have:

 int main()
 {
    int x = 12;

    int a = 11;
    if(x == 12)
    {
         int a = 2;

         printf("a=%d\n", a);
    }

  }

Again, it's pretty obvious what's going on here, right?

If we rewrite your code to show what actually happens:

int main()
{
        int a = 5;
        switch(a)
        { 
           int a;
               case 0:
                a=10 ;
                        printf("%d\n",a);
                        break;
                default :
                        printf("%d",a);

        }
        return 0;
}

Now, that's semantically the same thing as your code in the second variant. It just looks a bit different!

share|improve this answer
    
why it doesn't shadow the value of a in the outer but a in the case 0 –  yuan Dec 24 '12 at 15:00
    
Because the variable location is defined by the placement of the {} that surrounds it. I'll amend my answer a little bit... –  Mats Petersson Dec 24 '12 at 15:02
    
Updated my answer, I think it makes things clearer. –  Mats Petersson Dec 24 '12 at 15:15
    
Why does compile do such an action ?any clue in stadard? –  yuan Dec 24 '12 at 15:32
    
Yes, it's part of the language specification. Unfortunately, I can't quote exact section and paragraph, but the above explains HOW it works and why you get the result you get (naturally, if I change int a to int a = 42;, you wouldn't be surprised to see 42 being shown, right? –  Mats Petersson Dec 24 '12 at 15:38

Without '{}', you just jump over the initialization of the inner variable 'a' (it still defined, though), so you get an uninitialized 'a', in this case, it is '0'.

BTW, with '{}', it should output '5'.

share|improve this answer
    
I have defined a in line 5 int a = 5;? –  yuan Dec 24 '12 at 14:14
1  
Nope, without '{}', the inner 'a' shadows the outer 'a'. –  Cong Wang Dec 24 '12 at 14:15

I appreciate the usage of assembly here in the post as it helps to understand the code in a better way.

Now what happened here.

Lets discuss this issue in cases

case 1 :

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int a=5;

    switch(a)
    {
        case 0:
        {
            ;
            int a = 10;
            printf("%d in case 0\n",a);
            break;
            ;
        }
        default:
            printf("%d in default case\n",a);
            break;
    }
    return 0;
}

Case 1 Assembly:

    .file   "test1.c"
    .section    .rodata
.LC0:
    .string "%d in case 0\n"
.LC1:
    .string "%d in default case\n"
    .text
.globl main
    .type   main, @function
main:
    pushl   %ebp
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    andl    $-16, %esp
    subl    $32, %esp
    movl    $5, 28(%esp)
    movl    28(%esp), %eax
    testl   %eax, %eax
    jne .L6
.L3:
    movl    $10, 24(%esp)
    movl    $.LC0, %eax
    movl    24(%esp), %edx
    movl    %edx, 4(%esp)
    movl    %eax, (%esp)
    call    printf
    jmp .L4
.L6:
    movl    $.LC1, %eax
    movl    28(%esp), %edx
    movl    %edx, 4(%esp)
    movl    %eax, (%esp)
    call    printf
.L4:
    movl    $0, %eax
    leave
    ret

case 1 o/p: root@local-host#./a.out 5 in default case

Explanation : This is as expected because as you can see the statement in assembly

movl    $5, 28(%esp)

we are copying / moving 5 to 28(%esp) location

movl    28(%esp), %eax
testl   %eax, %eax its a switch equivalent

in main tag

here 28(%esp) is nothing but the value of a (int a=5;)

And at L3 all 24(%esp) is used to store the value 10 Please note that ebx register is used hereas new a. And L6 is the default case now look at the following statement movl 28(%esp), %edx here 28(%esp) (which is nothing but value of a) is copied to o/p hence our o/p is as expected.

Case 2:

include

int main() { int a=5;

switch(a)
    {
    case 0:
        ;
        int a = 10;
        printf("%d in case 0\n",a);
        break;
    default:
        printf("%d in default case\n",a);
        break;
    }

return 0; }

Case 2 Assembly: .file "test1.c" .section .rodata .LC0: .string "%d in case 0\n" .LC1: .string "%d in default case\n" .text .globl main .type main, @function main: pushl %ebp movl %esp, %ebp andl $-16, %esp subl $32, %esp movl $5, 28(%esp) movl 28(%esp), %eax testl %eax, %eax jne .L6 .L3: movl $10, 24(%esp) movl $.LC0, %eax movl 24(%esp), %edx movl %edx, 4(%esp) movl %eax, (%esp) call printf jmp .L4 .L6: movl $.LC1, %eax movl 24(%esp), %edx movl %edx, 4(%esp) movl %eax, (%esp) call printf .L4: movl $0, %eax leave ret

Case 2 o/p: root@local-host#./a.out 134513723 in default case

A garbage value Let me explain here also the 28(%esp) is the value of a Now take a close look at L3 and L6 labels Here is what you find during the code at 24%esp again a is created only if the case 0 satisfies. As the case of 0 is not satisfied the 24%esp will not get initialised i.e int a = 10;

And we are going to default which is L6 and we are trying to get 24%esp value which is not yet initilised (but it is a valid location) as we havent went to case 0. Thats why we are getting garbage value.

Case 3:

include

int main() { int a=5;

switch(a)
    {
    case 5:
        ;
        int a = 10;
        printf("%d in case 5\n",a);
    default:
        printf("%d in default case\n",a);
        break;
    }

return 0; }

Case 3 assembly: .file "test1.c" .section .rodata .LC0: .string "%d in case 5\n" .LC1: .string "%d in default case\n" .text .globl main .type main, @function main: pushl %ebp movl %esp, %ebp andl $-16, %esp subl $32, %esp movl $5, 28(%esp) movl 28(%esp), %eax cmpl $5, %eax jne .L2 .L3: movl $10, 24(%esp) movl $.LC0, %eax movl 24(%esp), %edx movl %edx, 4(%esp) movl %eax, (%esp) call printf .L2: movl $.LC1, %eax movl 24(%esp), %edx movl %edx, 4(%esp) movl %eax, (%esp) call printf movl $0, %eax leave ret

Case 3 o/p: root@local-host#./a.out 10 in case 0 10 in default case

Here as you can see that the new a is created at 24(%esp) and initailised at case 5 so the value will be same at default location.

In L3 label movl 24(%esp), %edx In L2 Label movl 24(%esp), %edx

So same location 24(%esp) is used which is created and initialised at cse 5 and flow through the default.

Case 4:

include

int main() { int a=5;

switch(a)
    {
    case 0:
        ;
        static int a = 10;
        printf("%d in case 0\n",a);
        break;
    default:
        printf("%d in default\n",a);
        break;
    }

return 0; }

Case 4 Assembley: .file "test1.c" .section .rodata .LC0: .string "%d in case 0\n" .LC1: .string "%d in default\n" .text .globl main .type main, @function main: pushl %ebp movl %esp, %ebp andl $-16, %esp subl $32, %esp movl $5, 28(%esp) movl 28(%esp), %eax testl %eax, %eax jne .L6 .L3: movl a.1706, %edx movl $.LC0, %eax movl %edx, 4(%esp) movl %eax, (%esp) call printf jmp .L4 .L6: movl a.1706, %edx movl $.LC1, %eax movl %edx, 4(%esp) movl %eax, (%esp) call printf .L4: movl $0, %eax leave ret .size main, .-main .data .align 4 .type a.1706, @object .size a.1706, 4 a.1706: .long 10 .ident "GCC: (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.4.4-14ubuntu5.1) 4.4.5" .section .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

Case 4 O/p: root@local-host#./a.out 10 in default

This makes sense as the static type is a global and stored in the data section so During execution the global value i.e the static int a is in data section and initialized as 10.

Case 5:

include

int main() { int a=5;

switch(a)
    {
    case 0:
        {
        ;
        static int a = 10;
        printf("%d in case 0\n",a);
        break;
        }
    default:
        printf("%d in default\n",a);
        break;
    }

return 0; }

Case 5 Assembly: .file "test1.c" .section .rodata .LC0: .string "%d in case 0\n" .LC1: .string "%d in default\n" .text .globl main .type main, @function main: pushl %ebp movl %esp, %ebp andl $-16, %esp subl $32, %esp movl $5, 28(%esp) movl 28(%esp), %eax testl %eax, %eax jne .L6 .L3: movl a.1706, %edx movl $.LC0, %eax movl %edx, 4(%esp) movl %eax, (%esp) call printf jmp .L4 .L6: movl $.LC1, %eax movl 28(%esp), %edx movl %edx, 4(%esp) movl %eax, (%esp) call printf .L4: movl $0, %eax leave ret .size main, .-main .data .align 4 .type a.1706, @object .size a.1706, 4 a.1706: .long 10 .ident "GCC: (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.4.4-14ubuntu5.1) 4.4.5" .section .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

Case 5 O/p: root@local-host#./a.out 5 in default

Here due to the '{' delimiters the static value is confined to case 0 at assembler stage the default case is still getting the value from 28(%esp) which is as expected as at assemble time case 0 has static and is out of scope for default.

You can try different formats by removing breaks and applying '{' '}' delimiters

Never forget to look it in terms of scope and wrto assembly code.

share|improve this answer
    
The formatting of this answer had gone very badly wrong. I've tidied it up for case 1; you could use this as a template to fix up the remaining cases if you wanted. –  simonc Apr 9 '13 at 23:31

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