Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following example:

#include <iostream>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template<typename Type, template<typename> class Crtp>
class Base
{
    public:
        typedef int value;

        // f1: OK
        // Expected result: casts 4.2 to Base<Type, Crtp>::value
        value f1() {return 4.2;}

        // f2: NOT OK
        // Expected result: casts 4.2 to Crtp<Type>::value
        // But f2 does not compile: no type named 'value' 
        // in 'class Derived<double>'
        typename Crtp<Type>::value f2() {return 4.2;} 
};

template<typename Type>
class Derived : public Base<Type, Derived>
{
    public:
        typedef Type value;
};

int main()
{
    Derived<double> a;
    std::cout<<a.f1()<<std::endl;
    std::cout<<a.f2()<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}

How to solve this problem (Derived typedef unknown from the Base class) ?

EDIT: I've found a very simple trick. Can someone explain to me why the following is working and the previous version does not work? Is this trick ok with standard C++11 or it works because of the way the compiler works (here g++ 4.7.1) ?

#include <iostream>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template<typename Type, template<typename> class Crtp>
class Base
{
    public:
        typedef int value;
        value f1() {return 4.2;}
        template<typename T = Crtp<Type>> typename T::value f2() {return 4.2;}
};

template<typename Type>
class Derived : public Base<Type, Derived>
{
    public:
        typedef Type value;
};

int main()
{
    Derived<double> a;
    std::cout<<a.f1()<<std::endl;
    std::cout<<a.f2()<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have to use a wrapper class (here it's value_getter) which is declared before you define Base. You can then specialize it right before you defined Derived:

template<typename T>
struct value_getter;

template<typename Type, template<typename> class Crtp>
class Base
{
    public:
        typedef int value;

        value f1() {return 4.2;}

        // in 'class Derived<double>'
        typename value_getter<Crtp<Type> >::value f2() {return 4.2;} 
};

template<typename Type>
class Derived;

template<typename Type>
struct value_getter<Derived<Type> > {
    typedef Type value;
};

template<typename Type>
class Derived : public Base<Type, Derived>, public value_getter<Derived<Type> >
{
    public:
};

It's not exactly pretty, but at least it works.

share|improve this answer
1  
And the problem seems to be that Crtp<Type> is incomplete outside the body of the member function of Base. –  Steve Jessop Dec 24 '12 at 14:42
    
I have added a trick I've just found. –  Vincent Dec 24 '12 at 15:02
    
@Vincent That works because the template is only instantiated when first used, which is happening after the definition of Base. –  Pubby Dec 24 '12 at 15:07

Your trick works because f2 now doesn't get instantiated until it is actually used, when class Derived has been completed.

In your particular example, I might just recommend doing this:

#include <iostream>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template<typename Type, template<typename> class Crtp>
class Base
{
    public:
        typedef int value;

        value f1() {return 4.2;}

        Type f2() {return 4.2;} 
};

template<typename Type>
class Derived : public Base<Type, Derived>
{
    public:
        typedef Type value;
};

int main()
{
    Derived<double> a;
    std::cout<<a.f1()<<std::endl;
    std::cout<<a.f2()<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}

but your real code may have other needs that make that impractical.

share|improve this answer
    
So is it a good trick or an ugly thing coming from hell ? –  Vincent Dec 24 '12 at 15:10
    
@Vincent: In your particular example, there is an easier way, but it may not work in other situations. When writing C++, you are often just having to use the least ugly solution you can find that works. –  Vaughn Cato Dec 24 '12 at 15:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.