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Hi I need to find a way to declare an anonymous type for a method.This is my code:

public List<var> ListOfProducts(string subcategory)
{
    var products = (from p in dataContext.Products
                    join s in dataContext.SubCategories.Where(x => x.SubCatName == subcategory)
                        on p.SubcatId equals s.SubCatId
                    join b in dataContext.Brands on p.BrandId equals b.BrandId
                    select new
                    {
                        Subcategory = s.SubCatName,
                        Brand = b.BrandName,
                        p.ProductName,
                        p.ProductPrice
                    });
    return products;
} 

I don't know what type should I set the List for the method.What should I do in this case?

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2  
I think you can’t do it like that because the type is local to the method. Declare a public type that others can actually use. –  poke Dec 24 '12 at 16:39
2  
How would you use this method? –  SWeko Dec 24 '12 at 16:41
2  
I gave you the answer to this in your other question - you need to declare your own class with the properties you want. What did you not understand about my earlier comment? –  Jon Skeet Dec 24 '12 at 16:42
    
Depending on how you would use the method you might have a use for something like this stackoverflow.com/questions/612689/… –  thinkindeveloper Dec 24 '12 at 16:42
    
possible duplicate of Return anonymous type? –  nawfal Jun 28 at 13:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

You can't return an Anonymous Type from a method.

Just create a class for your type and return that.

public class Product
{
    string Subcategory { get; set; }
    string Brand { get; set; }
    string ProductName { get; set; }
    decimal ProductPrice { get; set; }
}

Then return as such:

var products = (from p in dataContext.Products
                    join s in dataContext.SubCategories.Where(x => x.SubCatName == subcategory) on p.SubcatId
                        equals s.SubCatId
                    join b in dataContext.Brands on p.BrandId equals b.BrandId
                    select new Product
                               {
                                   Subcategory = s.SubCatName,
                                   Brand = b.BrandName,
                                   p.ProductName,
                                   p.ProductPrice
                               });

    return products;

EDIT: To clarify my first statement, as @JamesMichaelHare points out, technically it is possible to return an anonymous type from a method by returning object or dynamic, but it's probably more hassle than it's worth since you'd have to use Reflection or some other way of accessing the properties of your object.

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This is the way I would do it. –  Gromer Dec 24 '12 at 16:43
1  
Just as a clarification, you are correct in that you cannot make the return type of a method an anonymous type, but it is possible to return anonymous objects from a method (as object, dynamic, etc.), though really if the object is scoping beyond the method in lifetime anonymous types wouldn't be best and a custom class is better. You stated it right, just wanted to make sure they didn't take it to mean anonymous objects themselves can't be returned... –  James Michael Hare Dec 24 '12 at 16:53

As per MSDN, The dynamic type enables the operations in which it occurs to bypass compile-time type checking. Instead, these operations are resolved at run time.

So Try this instead :

public IEnumerable<dynamic> ListOfProducts(string subcategory) 
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What I would say, you should define another model for this, if you use returned result for Presentation layer, you should define ViewModel, or if you use for distribution layer, you can define as Dto object

public class ProductDto
{
    public string Subcategory {get; set; }
    public string Brand { get; set; }
    public string ProductName{ get; set; }
    public decimal ProductPrice{ get; set; }
}
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Just a note: anonymous types are designed to be used inside the scope of a method(or a function) not outside of it.

But there is a way to do that by some extension methods and some additional castings (I do not like this):

(In your code you should add .ToList() to your LINQ expression too.)

Extension methods are:

static List<T> InitList<T>(this T o) { return new List<T>(); }
static T CastToThis<T>(this  T target, object o) { return (T)o; }

You can initialize a list of anonymous type by:

var list = new { Name = "Name", Age = 40 }.InitList();

Now cast the returned object of your method to type of this list by using:

list = list.CastToThis(returnedValueOfYourMethod);

And another thing: anonymous types are valid just inside an assembly and can not be passed across assembly boundaries. From here:

The C# specification guarantees you that when you use "the same" anonymous type in two places in one assembly the types unify into one type. In order to be "the same", the two anonymous types have to have the exact same member names and the exact same member types, in the exact same order.

All in all I do not understand why you need to do that because declaring a new type is far more practical and if you really need this you should look into dynamic type in C# and if you are going to do some more magical things you should employ reflection.

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