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So I've been struggling for a while with my Android application. I'm fairly new to Android programming and made the application for a customer. Back then I programmed it for new devices like the S2 and S3 from Samsung. Now I got a problem: Garbage Collection. I've read some posts about the mechanics and how to get less GC, but I don't think it will help. I hope someone can hint me on how to take care of GC.

My code does the following: it downloads a lot of data from a online CRM called vTiger. It's a dynamic system so the application gets a lot of linked data, not just (for example) a Users table with username and password. Now this goes into JSON objects and I split those out so I can use all the data, in a loop like this: for each module, get all records. Well those records combined are about 5000 (now, still growing with usage).

A lot of info, so I store all the information into ArrayList and ArrayList, which are simple objects I made to hold information. I remember I didn't just write the objects to the database instead of hold them in the ArrayList as the database got overloaded. So what I did is save all those objects (around 5000 - 10000) in the ArrayLists and then use Transactions on the SQLite database. This way it worked well.

BUT, On the emulator / older devices I get a LOT of GC_concurrent logging, which means I got memory leaks in my code. I understand that the device cannot hold all those objects in it's memory but how would you take care of this? Due to GC, older devices cannot process through my 'sync' function. For example I let the emulator run for a few hours but it was almost stuck (very,very, very slow) halfway through the sync.

Hope someone is willing to give me some advice, if even possible. Thanks in advance!

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Fairly certain that it is not possible to turn off completely. Furthermore, if it were it would still not be a good idea. –  NominSim Dec 24 '12 at 17:03
    
"On the emulator / older devices I get a LOT of GC_concurrent logging, which means I got memory leaks in my code." -- by definition, if you have garbage being collected, that memory is not being leaked. "For example I let the emulator run for a few hours but it was almost stuck (very,very, very slow) halfway through the sync." -- rather than guessing, use Traceview to determine exactly where your performance issues come from. –  CommonsWare Dec 24 '12 at 17:21
    
Thank you for the replies. I see a lot of ArrayList allocations which come from the stacking objects in the arraylist. @CommonsWare I bought your book a while ago but didn't find the time to read it yet.. For now I will implement a checkbox which gives the option not to download all the records from the server at the initial startup and implement a new sync function in the app which handles the records per 100 and re-use allocations –  Bobbie Feenstra Dec 24 '12 at 17:24

2 Answers 2

If you're loading a lot of data, you're going to get GC spikes. There's really no way around it. The only way to not have as big of spikes is to chunk the data--split it into smaller pieces (possibly per-device), and process them before loading more.

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Instead of requesting all the data from the service at once, request the data in chunks. This will prevent memory from filling up and forcing small GCs.

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Thanks for the replies, I'll implement a switch that will check if the device is old or new, and will not download all the records at once but rather only the necessary information and download those records in batches later! –  Bobbie Feenstra Dec 24 '12 at 17:21

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