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I'd like to verify that calls against a mock only ever happen with some expected argument values, and never with anything else.

public interface ADependancy {
    public void method(String parameter, String otherParameter);
}


public class Foo {
    private ADependancy myHelper;

    public Foo(ADependancy helper) {
        this.myHelper = helper;
    }

    public void good() {
        myHelper.method("expected","expected");
        myHelper.method("expected","expected");
        myHelper.method("expected","expected");
    }

    public void bad() {
        myHelper.method("expected","expected");
        myHelper.method("expected","UNexpected");
        myHelper.method("expected","expected");
    }
}

I tried this:

public class FooTest extends TestCase {
    private ADependancy mock =mock(ADependancy.class);;
    private Foo foo  = new Foo(mock);

    @Test
    public void testGood() {
        foo.good();
        validateOnlyCalledWithExpected();
    }

    @Test
    public void testBad() {
        foo.bad();
        validateOnlyCalledWithExpected();
    }

    private void validateOnlyCalledWithExpected() {
        verify(mock,atLeastOnce()).method(eq("expected"),eq("expected"));
        verify(mock,never()).method(not(eq("expected")),not(eq("expected")));
    }
}

Expecting testBad to fail, but instead the test passes. If method only takes one parameter, this works as expected.

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2 Answers 2

You could use the verifyNoMoreInteractions static method, documented at http://docs.mockito.googlecode.com/hg/latest/org/mockito/Mockito.html#finding_redundant_invocations.

verify(mock).method(eq("expected"),eq("expected"));
verifyNoMoreInteractions(mock);

Alternatively, you could write

verify(mock).method(eq("expected"),eq("expected"));
verify(mock,never()).method(anyString(),anyString());

because the second call to verify will disregard the calls that have already been verified.

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I'd like this better, but it doesn't seem to work for my example. Perhaps it is the fact that I am calling method more than once? (See the "atLeastOnce" ); –  derekv Dec 26 '12 at 19:34
    
OK, then put the atLeastOnce() in. I didn't bother typing that because it was clear from your question that you already knew how to use atLeastOnce(). –  David Wallace Dec 27 '12 at 23:21
    
No, I meant that it literally doesn't work, when I plug in you code to my example, then both tests fail... OK upon further inspection your first snippit does appear to work as desired. It is just second snippit which doesn't work. –  derekv Dec 27 '12 at 23:39
    
Really? OK, I'll re-test it and try to find out what's going on. This won't be today though; I'm busy. –  David Wallace Dec 27 '12 at 23:52
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It was a logic mistake.

I wanted to assert that each argument is never anything but the expected value. But instead, what I was actually asserting was that it never happens that they are ALL not the expected value. So with the way I had it, it did not fail as desired, because in fact, some of the arguments are not not the expected value, therefore the method is never called with all the parameters not the expected value, and the verify passes.

Thus, this works for what I wanted:

    private void validateOnlyCalledWithExpected() {
        verify(mock,atLeastOnce()).method(eq("expected"),eq("expected"));
        verify(mock,never()).method(not(eq("expected")),anyString());
        verify(mock,never()).method(anyString(),not(eq("expected")));
    }
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