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I've been working on coding a simple stack memory. It has 4 address bits and thus can store 16 elements. Everything works fine, but the problem is that when all 16 memory elements have been written to, the counter that keeps track of the memory location overflows and resets it to 0000. I cannot find out the reason for this. All my registers are of correct width.

reg_push and reg_pop are incremented and decremented together, and these are the registers that keep track of the memory location.

Here is the simulation showing the overflow. stack simulation

Here is the code:

module stack # (parameter dbits = 3, abits = 4)(
input clock,
input reset,
input push,
input pop,
input [dbits-1:0] din,
output [dbits-1:0] dout,
output full,
output empty
);

reg [dbits-1:0] regarray[2**abits-1:0]; //number of words in fifo = 2^(number of address bits)
reg [abits-1:0] reg_push, reg_pop, next_push, next_pop;
reg full_reg, empty_reg, full_next, empty_next;
reg [dbits-1:0] out;
wire wr_en;

wire db_push, db_pop;
reg dffpop1, dffpop2, dffpush1, dffpush2;

always @ (posedge clock) dffpush1 <= push; 
always @ (posedge clock) dffpush2 <= dffpush1;

assign db_push = ~dffpush2 & dffpush1; //monostable multivibrator to detect only one pulse of the button

always @ (posedge clock) dffpop1 <= pop;
always @ (posedge clock) dffpop2 <= dffpop1;

assign db_pop = ~dffpop2 & dffpop1; //monostable multivibrator to detect only one pulse of the button

assign wr_en = db_push & ~full; //only push if write signal is high and stack is not full

//always block for write operation
always @ (posedge clock)
    if(wr_en) regarray[reg_push] = din;

//always block for read operation   
always @ (posedge clock)
begin
    if(db_pop)
        out <= regarray[reg_pop];
end


always @ (posedge clock or posedge reset)
begin
    if(reset)
        begin
            full_reg <= 0;
            empty_reg <= 1;
            reg_push <= 0;
            reg_pop <= 0;
        end
    else
        begin
            full_reg <= full_next;//created the next registers to avoid the error of mixing blocking and non blocking assignment to the same signal
            empty_reg <= empty_next;
            reg_push <= next_push;
            reg_pop <= next_pop;
        end
end

always @ (*)
begin
    full_next = full_reg; //default values stay the same
    empty_next = empty_reg;
    next_push = reg_push;
    next_pop = reg_pop;

    if(db_push)
    begin
        if(~full) //if stack is not full continue
        begin
            empty_next = 0;
            next_push = reg_push + 1;
            next_pop = reg_pop + 1;
            if(reg_push == (2**abits - 1)) full_next = 1; //all registers have been written to
        end
    end

    else if (db_pop)
    begin
        if(~empty) //if stack is not empty continue
        begin
            full_next = 0;
            next_pop = reg_pop - 1;
            next_push = reg_push - 1;
            if(reg_pop == 0) empty_next = 1; //all data has been read
        end
    end
end


assign full = full_reg;
assign empty = empty_reg;
assign dout = out;

endmodule

Now if I use this stack without making it reach its full capacity, it will work perfectly. It's only when I store all 16 elements into it that the problem arises.

share|improve this question
    
It looks like you prevent pushing data onto the stack if it is full. That means you are losing the data you are trying to push when full. Customarily, that would be detected by setting an error status bit. –  toolic Dec 24 '12 at 20:03
    
No, I want it that way. When full ignore all incoming data. But that does not solve my problem. why does it increment after 16? –  ipunished Dec 24 '12 at 20:22
    
Because you increment it after 16. When pushing while full, don't increment the pop pointer. –  toolic Dec 24 '12 at 21:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Extend your pop pointer an extra bit. A 4-bit register can only store the a value 0 through 15. Any value above that will ignore the upper bits, effectively doing a mod 16. Hence assigning 16 will result in 0.

Option 1: expand to a 5-bit register:

Try changing:

reg [abits-1:0] reg_push, reg_pop, next_push, next_pop;

To:

reg [abits:0] reg_push, reg_pop, next_push, next_pop;

Option 2: Use full_reg are the 5th bit in evaluations:

Change:

if(reg_push == (2**abits - 1)) full_next = 1; //all registers have been written to
...
if(reg_pop == 0) empty_next = 1; //all data has been read

To:

if({full_reg,reg_push} >= (2**abits - 1)) full_next = 1; //all registers have been written to
...
if({full_reg,reg_pop} == 0) empty_next = 1; //all data has been read
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but wont that make it a 5 bit register (0,1,2,3,4) which goes against my design as the registers are to be 4 bits as per the address parameter. –  ipunished Jan 16 '13 at 10:47
    
Then use the reg_full as the 5th bit: if(reg_pop == 0) empty_next = 1; //all data has been read to if({reg_full,reg_pop} == 0) empty_next = 1; //all data has been read if(reg_push == (2**abits - 1)) full_next = 1; //all registers have been written to to if({reg_full,reg_push} >= (2**abits - 1)) full_next = 1; //all registers have been written to –  Greg Jan 21 '13 at 20:18

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