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Well, I have an abstract virtual machine ("PAWN") which is running from my code and the scripts can execute functions, those functions are registered to the script from the C code which gets executed by my C++ code.

The c++ code has to supply an array in the form of

{ "name_i_want_the_function_to_have_in_the_script" , function_in_my_cpp_code }

if the function is not in the array, it cannot be executed. (because it doesn''t "exist")

So this brings us to this:

My functions look like this:

//Pawn Functions
#define PWNFUNC(a) static cell AMX_NATIVE_CALL a(AMX *amx, cell *params)

namespace PawnFunc
{
    PWNFUNC(GGV)
    {
        return pGameInterface->FindGameVersion();
    }
};//namespace PawnFunc

and the array with the scripting functions information is in another file, like this:

AMX_NATIVE_INFO custom_Natives[] =
{
    {   "GetGameVersion", PawnFunc::GGV   },
    {   0,0   }
};

and the question is now:

is it possible to make that array auto updated? (before/at compile time or code initialization time)

as for now I have to add each function manually. Which is sometimes annoying and more prone for errors.

I would like to change it so I could do:

//Pawn Functions
#define PWNFUNC(a,b) ...?...

namespace PawnFunc
{
    PWNFUNC(GGV,GetGameVersion)//{ "GetGameVersion", PawnFunc::GGV }, is now added to "custom_Natives" array
    {
        return pGameInterface->FindGameVersion();
    }
};//namespace PawnFunc

Is this possible at all? If yes, how could I achieve this?

maybe it is possible to loop the namespace?

Edit: here is some pseudo code: http://ideone.com/btG2lx

And also a note: I can do it at runtime, but then it has to be done at DLLMain (my program is a DLL).

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Why don't you just use dynamic loading? –  user529758 Dec 24 '12 at 20:52
    
@H2CO3 can you explain? –  user1182183 Dec 24 '12 at 20:53
    
I mean, you can obtain function pointers from a function name using dlopen() and dlsym(). Isn't that what you're looking for? –  user529758 Dec 24 '12 at 20:55
    
I don't want to load DLL's, my program loads scripts (lua-like) and the functions must be pushed to the script. they can only be pushed once (at script initlialization) –  user1182183 Dec 24 '12 at 20:56
    
Is this some kind of a scripting language then? –  user529758 Dec 24 '12 at 20:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

This #define will do the job, if you use a std::vector as the storage for your script info.

(Note that the standard guarantees that you'll still get a C-style array from &custom_Natives[0])

std::vector<AMX_NATIVE_INFO> custom_Natives;

#define PWNFUNC(NAME, FUNC) \
 struct IMPL_ ## FUNC { \
   IMPL_ ## FUNC() { \
     AMX_NATIVE_INFO entry = { NAME, PawnFunc::FUNC }; \
     custom_Natives.push_back( entry ); \
   } \
 } INSTANCE_ ## FUNC; \
 static cell AMX_NATIVE_CALL FUNC(AMX *amx, cell *params)

Now code like this will both define the function and add the script entry to custom_Natives.

PWNFUNC("GetGameVersion", GGV)
{
    return pGameInterface->FindGameVersion();
}
share|improve this answer
    
perfectly, you're a hero : ) –  user1182183 Jan 19 '13 at 22:03

What I could come up with (assuming C-style arrays and C-linkage functions):

AMX_NATIVE_INFO custom_natives[] =
{
    { "GetGameVersion", TheGGVFunc },
    { 0, 0 }
};

// here a function call named `GetGameVersion` was encountered,
// so let's look it up using a naive linear search
const char *toBeCalled = "GetGameVersion"; // obtain this somehow
void (*fptr)(void) = NULL;
for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(custom_natives) / sizeof(*custom_natives) - 1; i++) {
    const char *name = custom_natives[i].name;
    if (strcmp(toBeCalled, name) == 0) {
        fptr = custom_natives[i].func;
        break;
    }
}

if (fptr != NULL) {
    fptr();
}
share|improve this answer
    
a bit unclear what I have to do with this, here is some pseudo code: ideone.com/btG2lx –  user1182183 Dec 24 '12 at 21:31

You can approximate it; the idea is to use a global std::vector instead of a C array, and to use constructors of global objects to extend the vector. That way your array will be initialized by the time main() starts executing. So instead of a custom_Natives array you would have a

std::vector<MethodArrayElementType> custom_Natives;

vector (replace MethodArrayElementType with the name of the struct which holds the string -> function pointer mapping). You can treat this vector like a plain C array by using &custom_Natives[0].

Then, right next to every function you define, you add a little Registrar class to register the method:

PWNFUNC(GGV) {
    // Your implementation goes here...
}

struct GGV_Registrar {
    GGV_Registrar() {
         MethodArrayElementType e = { "GetGameVersion", GGV };
        custom_Natives.push_back( e );
    };
} GGV_Registrar_instance;

The constructor of the global GGV_Registrar_instance constructor will be called before main() is called, and it will update the custom_Natives vector.

share|improve this answer
    
so for each function I still have to add it manually? can't I do something like this: (pseudocode): ideone.com/btG2lx –  user1182183 Dec 24 '12 at 21:21

We do something like this, but instead of using an array we use a linked list. So your example would become

namespace PawnFunc
{
    PWNFUNC(GGV)
    {
        return pGameInterface->FindGameVersion();
    }
    PawnRegister GGVfunc( "GetGameVersion", GGV );
};//namespace PawnFunc

The constructor for PawnRegister adds all the objects (like GVVfunc) to a linked list. When your script engine wants to lookup a function, it traverses the list instead of scanning the array. I suppose you could set up PawnRegister to add entries to an array instead.

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