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I've set up the EC2 instance couple days ago and even last night I was able to SSH to it with no problems. Today morning, I can't ssh to it. Port 22 is already open in the security group and I haven't changed anything since last night.

Error:

ssh: connect to host [ip address] port 22: Connection refused

I had similar issue recently and i couldn't figure out why it was happening, so I had to create a new instance, set it up again, and connect and configure all EBS storages to the new one. Took me couple hours... and now it's happening again. In the previous one, I've installed denyhost, which might have blocked me, but in the current one, there are only apache2, and mysql running.

The current instance has been up for 16 hours now, so I don't think it's because it didn't finish booting... Also, port 22 is open to all sources (0.0.0.0/0) and is using tcp protocol.

Any ideas?

Thanks.

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Did you set the SSH security on the instance to allow all IPs or just yours? If just yours, did your IP change? –  Kirk Dec 24 '12 at 22:32
    
@Kirk: source is 0.0.0.0/0 for all ports including 22. Protocol: tcp. –  shershams Dec 24 '12 at 22:34
    
Have you created AMI from your Instance? If so, run new Instance from it. –  Roman Newaza Dec 27 '12 at 3:13
    
Just in case you did something wrong in config files and now you are outside can't get in, the system log in EC2 won't see you anything. If it's just about to comment out something from config file (which it happened to me while ago and I was changing my ssh and couldn't get in anymore) you can simply connect via ftp (I have vsftpd and Adobe DW) with access to "/" and just go to /etc/ssh/ssh_config or other places you may want to comment out things you've done and reboot you system from EC2 dashboard. If it's about the config files, you may want to have ftp access. –  Maziyar Mar 22 '13 at 9:39
1  
@kirk Thank you so much! My IP had changed and I had set my security group to accept only from a single IP. I had lost SSH access to 4 boxes because of this! Fixed now :). –  CodeManiak Feb 11 at 6:58

5 Answers 5

For those of you who came across this post because you are unable to SSH into your EC2 instance after a reboot, this is cross-posted to a similar question at serverfault:

From the AWS Developer Forum post on this topic:

Try stopping the broken instance, detaching the EBS volume, and attaching it as a secondary volume to another instance. Once you've mounted the broken volume somewhere on the other instance, check the /etc/sshd_config file (near the bottom). I had a few RHEL instances where Yum scrogged the sshd_config inserting duplicate lines at the bottom that caused sshd to fail on startup because of syntax errors.

Once you've fixed it, just unmount the volume, detach, reattach to your other instance and fire it back up again.

Let's break this down, with links to the AWS documentation:

  1. Stop the broken instance and detach the EBS (root) volume by going into the EC2 Management Console, clicking on "Elastic Block Store" > "Volumes", the right-clicking on the volume associated with the instance you stopped.
  2. Start a new instance in the same region and of the same OS as the broken instance then attach the original EBS root volume as a secondary volume to your new instance. The commands in step 4 below assume you mount the volume to a folder called "data".
  3. Once you've mounted the broken volume somewhere on the other instance,
  4. check the "/etc/sshd_config" file for the duplicate entries by issuing these commands:
    • cd /etc/ssh
    • sudo nano sshd_config
    • ctrl-v a bunch of times to get to the bottom of the file
    • ctrl-k all the lines at the bottom mentioning "PermitRootLogin without-password" and "UseDNS no"
    • ctrl-x and Y to save and exit the edited file
  5. @Telegard points out (in his comment) that we've only fixed the symptom. We can fix the cause by commenting out the 3 related lines in the "/etc/rc.local" file. So:
    • cd /etc
    • sudo nano rc.local
    • look for the "PermitRootLogin..." lines and delete them
    • ctrl-x and Y to save and exit the edited file
  6. Once you've fixed it, just unmount the volume,
  7. detach by going into the EC2 Management Console, clicking on "Elastic Block Store" > "Volumes", the right-clicking on the volume associated with the instance you stopped,
  8. reattach to your other instance and
  9. fire it back up again.
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This is the most useful post on this problem! Thanks so much. I'd add that to make the volume a root volume name it /dev/sda1 under Red HaT. –  Sych May 29 '14 at 10:30
    
@Sych: happy to help. There is a section within the volume attachment documentation that gives guidance on root volume naming: docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/… –  Jeromy French May 29 '14 at 13:11

This happened to me on a Red Hat EC2 instance because these two lines were being automatically appended the end of the /etc/ssh/sshd_config file every time I launched my instance:

PermitRootLogin without-password
UseDNS no

One of these append operations was done without a line break, so the tail of the sshd_config file looked like:

PermitRootLogin without-password
UseDNS noPermitRootLogin without-password
UseDNS no

That caused sshd to fail to start on the next launch. I think this was caused by the bug reported here: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=956531 The solution was to remove all the duplicate entries at the bottom of the sshd_config file, and add extra line breaks at the end.

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4  
These lines get added every time the instance boots (or reboots) by the /etc/rc.local file. To prevent this from happening over and over, you also need to comment out the 3 related lines in the /etc/rc.local file. This will fix the problem for good. –  Telegard Feb 14 '14 at 19:19
    
ianmcook, @Telegard: thanks, this did the trick –  Jeromy French May 28 '14 at 21:52
up vote 12 down vote accepted

With the help of @abhi.gupta200297, we were able to resolve it.

The issue was the error in /etc/fstab, and sshd was supposed to be started after fstab is successful. But it wasn't, hence, the sshd wouldn't start and that's why it was refusing the connection. Solution was to create a temporary instance, mount the root EBS from the original instance, and comment out stuff from the fstab and voila, it's letting me connect again. And for the future, I just stopped using fstab and created bunch of shell commands to mount the EBS volumes to directories and added them in /etc/init.d/ebs-init-mount file and then run update-rc.d ebs-init-mount defaults to initialize the file and I'm no longer having issues with locked ssh.

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Could you make a blog post or comment here the shell commands / init script you used to replace fstab? I am experiencing this same problem. –  S-K' Apr 26 '13 at 16:19

Looks like sshd might have stopped for some reason. Is the instance EBS backed? if thats the case, try shutting it down and starting it back up. That should solve the problem.

Also, are you able to ssh from AWS web console? They have a java plugin there to ssh into the instance.

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aws web console also says connection refused. I will try to reboot right now. But is there any other way other than rebooting it? It makes services and websites running there unavailable for users... –  shershams Dec 24 '12 at 22:59
    
Try doing a telnet to the instance on port 22. telnet hostname 22. If it connects, that will at least tell us that sshd is running, but we are getting blocked for some reason and we can troubleshoot from there. –  abhi.gupta200297 Dec 24 '12 at 23:00
    
connection refused... I've rebooted the instance and still cannot access it. Also, now apache and mysql are not running as well. Help? –  shershams Dec 24 '12 at 23:03
    
Thats very weird. So telnet also cannot connect to port 22? Can you also try ssh'ing with the -v switch? what does that output? –  abhi.gupta200297 Dec 24 '12 at 23:06
    
jsbin.com/upebib/1 –  shershams Dec 24 '12 at 23:08

Go to your AWS management console > select instance > right click and select "Get System Logs" This will list what went wrong.

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1  
nothing useful there... last logs are talking about EBS volumes, which I was working with last night. –  shershams Dec 24 '12 at 22:38

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