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I'm looking for a way to permanently store a state + a serialized class (or something) so that when a computer / program crashes I can fix stuff at next program start. As an example, when I upload a file, I need to know at next boot if it didn't complete. That way I can remove the remote file (or append to it if possible etc.)

Now, I came up with some pseudo code that basically uses a database (by an interface to easily swap) to create tables + columns + rows that store the states, and delete the row when the job succesfully completed. At each boot we can now read from the database and call corresponding actions based on the state we were last in.

The problems:

  1. I'm not sure if what I'm doing is even necessary to accomplish this... alternatives?
  2. I was kind of hoping there was a library available that already did this if this is the right way to go (no need to re-invent the wheel)
  3. What about dependency injection? In my code I'm simply adding the class name to the rows, but what if I wanted to expose all this for plugins and there's a class name clash? In fact, how will I know which injected dll I have to pass the stored data to to begin with? (Not sure if I'm still making sense at this point.) Or what if a dependency gets removed, how will I be able to identify which database files (if using files) belonged to said removed plugin, and ask the user to keep it or not?

Example code so far:

class CPersistantthingy
{
    IDatabase mDatabase;
    string _mTablename;
    List<string> _mCols = new List<string>(new string[]{"State","SerializedClass","ClassType"}); //can't contain "ID"

    public Dictionary<string,string> AcquireRow()
    {
        //Make sure table exists and has the columns we need
        CreateTableIfNotExist();
        if(!VerifyTableHasColumns())
            throw new CorruptedTableException();

        //Create new row with State "undef", fetch the Auto Increment ID and return it
        return mDatabase.CreateRow();
    }

    public void WriteRow(Dictionary<string,string> row)
    {
        mDatabase.UpdateRow(row); //The database will lookup by ID and update fields.
    }

    private void CreateTableIfNotExist()
    {
        mDatabase.CreateTableIfNotExist(_mTablename, _mCols);
    }

    private bool VerifyTableHasColumns()
    {
        return mDatabase.VerifyTableHasColumns(_mTablename, _mCols);
    }
}
interface IDatabase
{
    //CreateTable / CreateRow / UpdateRow etc etc
}

Example for file upload:

States:
Acquired //Chosen a remote path
Started //First bytes written to server
Failed //Upload failed

So a row looks like:

State: Acquired|Started|Failed
SerializedClass: {host: "127.0.0.1", user: "usr", local:"C:\somefile.txt", remote:"/we/somefile.txt"}
ClassType: CFileObj

So now in my program I could use it like so;

SomeDatabaseClass_Object db = new SomeDatabaseClass_Object(blabla);
CPersistantthingy pers = new CPersistantthingy(db, "fileuploads");

private void StartUpload(string localfile)
{
    var row = pers.AcquireRow();
    row["State"] = "Acquired";
    row["ClassType"] = "CFileObj";

    /*Imagine that GetRemotePath reserves a remote path on the server we'll 
      upload our file to. That's how my current system works.*/
    string remfile = GetRemotePath(localfile);
    CFileObj obj = new CFileObj(currenthost, currentuser, localfile, remfile);

    row["SerializedClass"] = obj.Serialize();

    //Write the acquired state
    pers.WriteRow(row);

    //Uploading class has a callback to let us know when the first bytes have been written.
    try
    {
        StartUpload(obj.local, obj.remote, () => { row["State"] = "Started"; pers.WriteRow(row); } ); 
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        row["State"] = "Failed";
        pers.WriteRow(row);
        throw; //Catch at caller to immediately fix rather than waiting for next boot.
    }

    //Now do whatever else you want to do on a succesful upload. 
    //Maybe add new states for this too so we know at least the upload succeeded.

    //Finally delete the entry so it's not picked up at next boot.
    pers.DeleteByKey(row["ID"]);
}

And then to make sure the server is cleaned up of failed files (incomplete uploads) after a crash:

public static void Main()
{
    SomeDatabaseClass_Object db = new SomeDatabaseClass_Object(blabla);
    CPersistantthingy pers = new CPersistantthingy(db, "fileuploads");

    CUploadServerObj serverObj = new CUploadServerObj(bla,di,bla);
    serverObj.Connect();

    //Now let's imagine a class that hooks a state to an action etc.
    var ima = new CImagineIt(pers); 

    /*I may have picked a bad example because I'd have to do the same for all States
      but you get the idea. */
    ima.AddStateAction("Failed", (row) => { FixFailedUpload(serverObj, pers, row); });

    //Read all rows from database and fire actions accordingly
    ima.DoWork();
}

With the action, in this case, simply checking if the file on the server is smaller than the local file.

private void FixFailedUpload(CUploadServerObj serverObj, CPersistantthingy pers, Dictionary<string,string> row)
{
    if(!row["ClassType"].Equals("CFileObj"))
    {
        //handle error
        return;
    }

    CFileObj obj;
    try
    {
        obj = DeSerialize(row["SerializedClass"]);
    }//Catch and handle etc etc

    //Are we using different credentials this boot? Then we can't check.
    if(obj.host != currenthost || obj.usr != currentuser)
    {
        //handle error and return
    }

    try
    {
        if(serverObj.RemoteSizeSmaller(obj.local, obj.remote))
        {
            if(serverObj.DeleteFromRemote(obj.remote))
            {
                pers.DeleteByKey(row["ID"]);
            }
        }
    }
    catch(RemoteFileNotExistsException)
    {
        //The file didn't even exist so no worries
    }
    catch(RemoteFileDeleteException)
    {
        //The file existed but could not be removed.. it's probably time to request manual user input now because that's just weird.
    }
}

I think this could work, but it's not ideal. Maybe the upload failed because the reserved path was already written to by another process. Meaning we can't use the Acquired state to justify deleting files. Checking the fail reason after the fact won't help either because the program may crash in between the two. Meaning we're stuck at Acquired anyway. Or maybe we crash between the first bytes written and it's callback, meaning we're stuck at Acquired even though we did obtain the file path we reserved.

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