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I have two tables:

Companies: (id, name, city)
Workers: (id, name)

I would like to get all companies and sort them by numbers of employes.

The result should give:

count | company id | company name | city
------------------------------------------
90         6           foo corp      NY
45         9           bar corp      LA
0          3         foobar corp     HO

I tried:

select 
    c.*, 
    count(w.id) as c 
from 
    companies c 
left join 
    workers w 
on 
    c.id = w.company_id 
group by 
    c.id 
order by 
    c desc;

But that's not working as it tells me to group by g.name too :/

Any ideas?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You've aliased the table and column as the same thing, so don't do that. It's not invalid, just tough to follow.

Anyway, include all columns that you're selecting that aren't aggregates in your group by:

select 
    count(w.id) as mycount,
    w.company_id,
    c.company_name,
    c.city
from 
    companies c 
    left join workers w on 
        c.id=w.company_id 
group by 
    w.company_id,
    c.company_name,
    c.city
order by mycount desc;
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my table is actually must larger than those two columns (city and name), should I group by all of them? –  Ggolo Sep 9 '09 at 23:53
    
I think that yes you should for the GROUP BY clause to work, if not the query will fail –  MaxiWheat Sep 10 '09 at 0:19
    
@Ggolo: Any column you're selecting, you have to group by. –  Eric Sep 10 '09 at 0:28
    
ok, I tried the query and it worked great, only one problem, if the company has no workers, it won't appear in the results. Any way to make all companies appear in the results even when they have 0 workers? –  Ggolo Sep 10 '09 at 3:21
    
Nevermind, it's working, I was using a where clause. –  Ggolo Sep 10 '09 at 4:07

Try this as a subquery:

SELECT C.*
FROM 
(
  SELECT C.Id, C.Company_Name, C.City, COUNT(W.Id) AS CNT
  FROM Companies C
  LEFT JOIN Workers W ON W.Company_Id = C.Id
  GROUP BY C.Id, C.Company_Name, C.City
) T
ORDER BY T.CNT
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