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How do I go about binding a function to left and right arrow keys in Javascript and/or jQuery? I looked at the js-hotkey plugin for jQuery (wraps the built-in bind function to add an argument to recognize specific keys), but it doesn't seem to support arrow keys.

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10  
A lot of people still have this question, and so end up on this question. Unfortunately, the currently selected answer is far from ideal. Any chance you could consider one of the more recent answers as the accepted one? This would greatly benefit future people that are looking for a solution. For example, Sygmoral's answer will avoid browser incompatibilities and use jQuery more efficiently. :) –  Sygmoral Apr 25 '13 at 16:02
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10 Answers

up vote 376 down vote accepted
$(document).keydown(function(e){
    if (e.keyCode == 37) { 
       alert( "left pressed" );
       return false;
    }
});

Character codes:

37 - left

38 - up

39 - right

40 - down

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4  
Is there any purpose for the return? –  Alex S Sep 9 '09 at 23:53
17  
It stops any further keydown events being hit. –  s_hewitt Sep 9 '09 at 23:56
7  
Shadow: no, he means it stops the keydown event from firing on other DOM elements –  JasonWoof Sep 10 '09 at 1:17
2  
Except 39 is also apostrophe, isn’t it? –  Paul D. Waite Apr 30 '10 at 15:57
23  
When using jQuery, use e.which rather than e.keyCode for more browser support. See my comment below. –  Sygmoral Jan 26 '12 at 0:53
show 7 more comments

Do not use e.keyCode: it is not supported in all browsers, while e.which is normalized by jQuery. Also, don't end with return false because it prevents any other handlers from being fired.

So here's a cleaner solution:

$(document).keydown(function(e) {
    switch(e.which) {
        case 37: // left
        break;

        case 38: // up
        break;

        case 39: // right
        break;

        case 40: // down
        break;

        default: return; // exit this handler for other keys
    }
    e.preventDefault(); // prevent the default action (scroll / move caret)
});

Put your custom code for the arrow keys between the corresponding case and break lines.


For a pure javascript approach, replace the first two lines with:

document.onkeydown = function(e) {
    e = e || window.event;
    switch(e.which || e.keyCode) {
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11  
By far best answer. Uses e.which like jQuery recommends for cross-browser, uses e.preventDefault() instead of return false (return false on a jQuery event handler triggers both e.preventDefault() and e.stopPropagation(), the second of which is going to cause any later added events to fail since the event won't propagate to them), and at the end of the switch, will return without calling e.preventDefault() if it's any other key than the ones being looked for to not hinder other key usage, and instead of $.ui.keyCode.DOWN it compares to the numbers (MUCH faster). –  Jimbo Jonny Nov 24 '12 at 2:41
5  
this should be the accepted answer –  Iraklis Jan 25 '13 at 11:08
    
Very nice, works smooth. –  Travis J Mar 15 '13 at 10:39
    
Where do you find these key codes? –  Nathan Arthur Sep 17 '13 at 22:11
1  
Nathan: it seems that not all keycodes are consistent among browsers, but the arrow keys are some of those that are. See here: stackoverflow.com/questions/5603195/… –  Sygmoral Sep 18 '13 at 0:20
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You can use the keyCode of the arrow keys (37, 38, 39 and 40 for left, up, right and down):

$('.selector').keydown(function (e) {
  var keyCode = e.keyCode || e.which,
      arrow = {left: 37, up: 38, right: 39, down: 40 };

  switch (keyCode) {
    case arrow.left:
      //..
    break;
    case arrow.up:
      //..
    break;
    case arrow.right:
      //..
    break;
    case arrow.down:
      //..
    break;
  }
});

Check the above example here.

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1  
I'm not sure about your use of the || operator in line 2. Isn't a value other than zero or nonzero implementation specific and not guaranteed? I would use something more like: var keyCode = (e.keyCode?e.keyCode:e.which); +1 for the use of the arrow object to give the cases readable names. –  Mnebuerquo Apr 3 '10 at 22:58
5  
If you are using jQuery, you dont need to test for e.which: The event.which property normalizes event.keyCode and event.charCode - api.jquery.com/event.which –  JCM Mar 6 '12 at 22:45
    
I'm trying to put a key event listener on a table, but it wouldn't work. Is there a limited amount of selector types that support key event listeners? –  Arman Bimatov Oct 3 '13 at 21:24
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This is a bit late, but HotKeys has a very major bug which causes events to get executed multiple times if you attach more than one hotkey to an element. Just use plain jQuery.

$(element).keydown(function(ev) {
    if(ev.which == $.ui.keyCode.DOWN) {
        // your code
        ev.preventDefault();
    }
});
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+1 for using the ui keycode object. Much easier to understand than 37, 38, 39, or 40. Not sure why the top answer is using e.keyCode when the jQuery documentation explicitly states to use e.which to account for browser differences. Hopefully this answer gets more recognition for doing it right. –  J.Money Sep 3 '12 at 0:29
    
Using $.ui.keyCode.DOWN on every key press is a LOT slower than using the number. Just add a comment if concerned about clarity, especially since it has to be run every time any key is pressed. –  Jimbo Jonny Nov 24 '12 at 2:35
1  
You could easily cache the keycode in a variable if it really was slowing you down. That would be more readable than hard-coding an integer. Either way, it seems like an overzealous optimization to me, unless you've really measured a slowdown coming from it. In most uses the effect on performance will be absolutely insignificant. –  mackstann Nov 28 '12 at 20:17
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You can use KeyboardJS. I wrote the library for tasks just like this.

KeyboardJS.on('up', function() { console.log('up'); });
KeyboardJS.on('down', function() { console.log('down'); });
KeyboardJS.on('left', function() { console.log('right'); });
KeyboardJS.on('right', function() { console.log('left'); });

Checkout the library here => http://robertwhurst.github.com/KeyboardJS/

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Robert, nice work! Your library works well! –  WillC Nov 16 '12 at 1:37
    
this is nice, something I've been looking for, helps in my game dev! –  Teo.sk Dec 30 '12 at 18:49
    
This library looks awesome! I'll give it a try :) +1 –  william44isme Aug 7 '13 at 13:56
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I've simply combined the best bits from the other answers:

$(document).keydown(function(e){
    switch(e.which) {
        case $.ui.keyCode.LEFT:
        // your code here
        break;

        case $.ui.keyCode.UP:
        // your code here
        break;

        case $.ui.keyCode.RIGHT:
        // your code here
        break;

        case $.ui.keyCode.DOWN:
        // your code here
        break;

        default: return; // allow other keys to be handled
    }

    // prevent default action (eg. page moving up/down)
    // but consider accessibility (eg. user may want to use keys to choose a radio button)
    e.preventDefault();
});
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1  
thanks! I was just about to do what you did. –  kdubs Oct 21 '12 at 2:51
1  
Where is "ui" coming from? Getting " TypeError: $.ui is undefined " EDIT - I was missing JQuery UI. Got that loaded - no more error. –  a coder Feb 8 '13 at 3:19
    
He's apparently also using jQuery UI which must have that enum. I wouldn't include jQuery UI just for that, btw. –  Jethro Larson Dec 4 '13 at 2:00
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Are you sure jQuery.HotKeys doesn't support the arrow keys? I've messed around with their demo before and observed left, right, up, and down working when I tested it in IE7, Firefox 3.5.2, and Google Chrome 2.0.172...

EDIT: It appears jquery.hotkeys has been relocated to Github: https://github.com/jeresig/jquery.hotkeys

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I was reading where it said it was based on another library, and assumed that list of supported keys still applied. –  Alex S Sep 10 '09 at 0:15
    
I don't think that link is going to the right page anymore. –  y0mbo Feb 4 '12 at 15:09
1  
@y0mbo - You're right, I updated the link. Thanks! –  Pandincus Feb 4 '12 at 22:39
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Instead of using return false; as in the examples above, you can use e.preventDefault(); which does the same but is easier to understand and read.

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3  
return false; and e.preventDefault(); are not exactly the same. See stackoverflow.com/a/1357151/607874 –  Jose Rui Santos Mar 20 '12 at 10:47
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A terse solution using plain Javascript (thanks to Sygmoral for suggested improvements):

document.onkeydown = function(event) {
    event = event || window.event;
    switch (event.keyCode || event.which) {
        case 37:
            alert('left');
            break;
        case 39:
            alert('right');
            break;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
1  
Kudos for trying a pure javascript approach, but there are several issues with this one. The most important is that it will not work in e.g. Firefox where window.event is not defined. Also, it may cause undesired behavior such as scrolling the page, as that is the default action for arrow keys. In short: a proper pure javascript approach would be somewhat cumbersome in any application that needs complex event handling (I do make the assumption that an arrow event handler is usually part or something bigger). Good thing we have jQuery (or another library) for that. –  Sygmoral Aug 3 '13 at 0:24
    
@Sygmoral Thanks very much, good point. I found a more cross-browser solution here. Do you know offhand if this is compatible with all browsers? It works in Chrome and Firefox. –  1'' Aug 3 '13 at 1:25
    
That works indeed to get the event (in such a case I personally prefer e = e || window.event;), and then you'd need e.which || e.keyCode to get the key code since keyCode is not supported everywhere. As for the preventDefault method, I just read that this is supported in pure javascript as well. –  Sygmoral Aug 6 '13 at 18:04
    
@Sygmoral I think my solution works fine now, if you don't care about preventing the default behaviour. If you do, your new solution looks quite sharp. Thanks for the feedback! –  1'' Aug 7 '13 at 0:43
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You can use jQuery bind:

$(window).bind('keydown', function(e){

    if (e.keyCode==37) {
        console.log ('left');
    } else if (e.keyCode==38) {
        console.log ('up');
    } else if (e.keyCode==39) {
        console.log ('right');
    } else if (e.keyCode==40) {
        console.log ('down');
    }
});
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Does not offer any advantage over any of the other answers though, as jQuery's .keydown() is synonymous with .bind('keydown', ...). Further, it has all the same issues as the accepted answer. –  Sygmoral Jan 10 at 22:18
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