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There is a nice feature in bash, about localization (language translation):

TEXTDOMAIN=coreutils
LANG=fr_CH.utf8
echo $"system boot"
démarrage système

(Nota: For this work, fr_CH.utf8 was already generated on your system... Else you may try with your own locale... or install locales and generate one.)

The problem:

But if this work fine with simple strings, when string contain a \n (or worst: a backtick ` things are more complicated:

echo $"Written by %s, %s, %s,\nand %s.\n"
Written by %s, %s, %s,\nand %s.\n

This is not attended answer.

(Nota2: For this work, exact message has to be prepared in .mo message file, in this sample/test, I use existant coreutils.mo files, which could be unformated with the command msgunfmt.)

At all, the only way I've found to do the translation is:

eval echo \$\"$'Written by %s, %s, %s,\nand %s.\n'\"
Écrit par %s, %s, %s,
et %s.

or

msg=$'Written by %s, %s, %s,\nand %s.\n'
eval echo \$\""$msg"\"
Écrit par %s, %s, %s,
et %s.

(You could see two double quotes... not very sexy...)

And finally I could:

WRITTERS=(Hans Pierre Jackob Heliott)
eval printf \$\""$msg"\" ${WRITTERS[@]}
Écrit par Hans, Pierre, Jackob,
et Heliott.

But as I've heard recently that eval is evil... ;-)

In fact, I don't have problem with an eval that's run with only hard coded part, but I would appreciate a way to keep this eval out and to write this kind of part in a more natural or readable manner.

At all @techno 's answer let me see that my first idea is something dangerous as if WRITTERS contain some ;ls, for sample...

Edit: So question is:

How could I keep this eval out and/or write this in a more sexy fashion

Nota:

$ printf "I use bash %s on Debian %s\n" $BASH_VERSION $(</etc/debian_version)
I use bash 4.1.5(1)-release on Debian 6.0.6
share|improve this question
    
There's no question. –  n.m. Dec 25 '12 at 5:06
    
... I would appreciate a way to keep this eval out sound not really as a question, but it is. –  F. Hauri Dec 25 '12 at 7:05
    
Ah OK. For \n, try echo -e. It is still not very clear what exactly is being asked in other parts of the question. Why are you using echo at all? What's wrong with printf $"message key" $var1 $var2? –  n.m. Dec 25 '12 at 7:21
    
@n.m. I complain that $"$msg" will work fine only if $msg don't contain a \n. If so, need to write ugly thing like eval... \$\""$msg"\"... –  F. Hauri Dec 25 '12 at 7:34
1  
I'd suggest trying the help-bash mailing list. This is a feature that's rarely used both because it's obscure, and because of security bugs. Even people that do a lot of scripting don't tend to use it. –  ormaaj Dec 25 '12 at 9:19
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If using eval is bad with arbitrary variables, there is a way to do this only when called/needed, in running eval only on message part:

function lPrintf() {
    local sFormat="$(
        eval 'echo $"'"${1}"'"'.
    )"
    shift
    printf "${sFormat%.}" $@
}

lPrintf "system boot"
démarrage système

lPrintf  $'Written by %s, %s, %s,\nand %s.\n' techno moi lui-même bibi
Écrit par techno, moi, lui-même,
et bibi.

( The dot at end of translated string ensure that whole string, including leading line-break, where passed to variable sFormat. They will be dropped with ${sFormat%.} )

share|improve this answer
    
Nice way to limit use of eval. And to make them a little more sexy! +1, but there is an eval anyway... –  F. Hauri Dec 27 '12 at 22:47
    
Thanks to everyone. (My bounty will go to gniourf_gniourf unless best answer in 8 hours. But thanks to techno too, I like your lPrintf! ) –  F. Hauri Jan 3 '13 at 21:31
add comment

Well, there is my self answer:

This seem not well implemented now. Work in many situations, but, while

echo "$(gettext 'missing character class name `[::]'\')"
caractère de nom de classe « [::] » manquant

work simply, the same string seem impossible to translate using this bashism:

echo $"missing character class name `[::]'"
> 

the console stay locked (waiting for such an end of string) adding `" would immerse bash in a complex interpretation process :->>

> `"
bash: command substitution: line 1: Caractère de fin de fichier (EOF) prématuré lors de la recherche du « ' » correspondant
bash: command substitution: line 2: Erreur de syntaxe : fin de fichier prématurée
missing character class name 

And, of course:

echo $"missing character class name \`[::]'"
missing character class name `[::]'

make no translation. :-p

While translating this string containing two backticks work finely:

echo $"%s}: integer required between `{' and `}'"
%s} : entier requis entre « { » et « } »

There is a script where you may see some of mine unsuccessfull trys.

#!/bin/bash

echo "Localized tests"
export TEXTDOMAIN=coreutils
export LANG=fr_CH.UTF-8
export WRITTERS=(Athos Portos Aramis Dartagnan\ Le\ Beau)

echo '#First method# whitout eval'

declare -A MyMessages;
MyMessages[sysReboot]=$"system boot"
MyMessages[writtenBy]=$"Written by %s, %s, %s,
and %s.
"
MyMessages[intReq]=$"%s}: integer required between `{' and `}'"
MyMessages[trClass]=$"when translating, the only character classes that may appear in
string2 are `upper' and `lower'"
# MyMessages[missClass]=$"missing character class name `[::]'" 

for msgIdx in ${!MyMessages[@]} ;do
    printf "\n--- Test chain '%s' ---\n" $msgIdx
    case $msgIdx in
    writ* )
        printf "${MyMessages[$msgIdx]}\n" "${WRITTERS[@]}"
        ;;
    intReq )
        printf "ARRAY{${MyMessages[$msgIdx]}\n" NaN
        ;;
    * )
        printf "${MyMessages[$msgIdx]}\n"
        ;;
    esac
  done

echo $'###\n#Second method# whith limited eval'
unset MyMessages;

declare -A MyMessages;

lPrintf() {
    local sFormat="$(
        eval 'echo $"'"${1}"'"'.
    )"
    shift
    printf "${sFormat%.}" "$@"
}

MyMessages[sysReboot]="system boot"
MyMessages[writtenBy]=$'Written by %s, %s, %s,\nand %s.\n'
MyMessages[intReq]="%s}: integer required between \`{' and \`}'"
MyMessages[trClass]="when translating, the only character classes that "
MyMessages[trClass]+=$'may appear in\nstring2 '
MyMessages[trClass]+="are \`upper' and \`lower'"
MyMessages[missClass]="missing character class name \`[::]'"

for msgIdx in ${!MyMessages[@]} ;do
    printf "\n--- Test chain '%s' ---\n" $msgIdx
    case $msgIdx in
    writ* )
        lPrintf "${MyMessages[$msgIdx]}" "${WRITTERS[@]}"
        ;;
    intReq )
        lPrintf "${MyMessages[$msgIdx]}" NaN
        ;;
    * )
        lPrintf "${MyMessages[$msgIdx]}"
        ;;
    esac
  done

and his output:

Localized tests
#First method# whitout eval

--- Test chain 'trClass' ---
à la traduction, les seules classes de caractères qui peuvent apparaître
dans string2 sont « upper » ou « lower »

--- Test chain 'intReq' ---
ARRAY{NaN} : entier requis entre « { » et « } »

--- Test chain 'sysReboot' ---
démarrage système

--- Test chain 'writtenBy' ---
Écrit par Athos, Portos, Aramis,
et Dartagnan Le Beau.

###
#Second method# whith limited eval

--- Test chain 'trClass' ---
à la traduction, les seules classes de caractères qui peuvent apparaître
dans string2 sont « upper » ou « lower »
--- Test chain 'missClass' ---
./localized.sh: eval: line 44: Caractère de fin de fichier (EOF) prématuré lors de la recherche du « ` » correspondant
./localized.sh: eval: line 45: Erreur de syntaxe : fin de fichier prématurée

--- Test chain 'intReq' ---
NaN} : entier requis entre « { » et « } »
--- Test chain 'sysReboot' ---
démarrage système
--- Test chain 'writtenBy' ---
Écrit par Athos, Portos, Aramis,
et Dartagnan Le Beau.

If anyone could help my to remove comments and/or error message in this script!? ... (in less then 8 hours?!)

At all, thanks to everyone. (My bounty will go to @gniourf_gniourf unless best answer in 8 hours. But thanks to @techno too, I like your lPrintf! )

share|improve this answer
add comment

OK I think finally got it right.

iprintf() {
    msg="$2"
    domain="$1"
    shift
    shift
    imsg=$(gettext -ed "$domain" "$msg" ; echo EOF)
    imsg="${imsg%EOF}"
    printf "$imsg" "$@"
}

Usage example:

LANG=fr_CH.utf8 iprintf coreutils "If FILE is not specified, use %s.  %s as FILE is common.\n\n" foo bar
share|improve this answer
    
Yes sure, but if this let us keep eval and ugly form out, this add a fork and this is not as quick as invoking $"...". But thank for contrib! –  F. Hauri Dec 25 '12 at 21:41
    
If you can produce profiling data that pinpoint this fork as the performance bottleneck in your system, you probably should not have written it in bash in the first place. –  n.m. Dec 25 '12 at 21:51
    
difference exist (as tiny they are). The feature exist. So if they exist why did a need to use expensive fork? While each time cost have to be reduced, I think your comment is not constructive. –  F. Hauri Dec 26 '12 at 10:29
2  
More electrons are probably wasted on this thread than ever will be on all these forks... –  n.m. Dec 26 '12 at 11:26
1  
A shell script that doesn't invoke any external programs probably shouldn't be a shell script. Note the subshell doesn't really add any cost. It's a single fork+exec either way. @n.m. I'd use local variables, or better, use the parameters directly. It's also not a very good idea to expand a variable into the first argument of printf, especially in Bash, especially when it results from calling an external program. The -v option can result in executing arbitrary code. Also, shift can take an argument to indicate the number of shifts. –  ormaaj Dec 29 '12 at 7:02
show 1 more comment

I've played a little bit with this feature and this is what I came up with: you can include the newline verbatim as:

$ echo $"Written by %s.
> "
Écrit par %s.
$ 

In a script:

#!/bin/bash

message=$"Written by %s.
"

printf "$message" Gniourf

This script will output:

Écrit par Gniourf.

Ok, this is not really an answer, but it might help a little bit (at least, we're not using the evil eval).

Personal remark: I find this feature really clunky!

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, thank, I've seen that too, but as you said: this is not really -the- answer ;-) But +1 as your way of storing and re-using`$message` is cleaner as what I've already tested. (Initial idea was using bash associative array for storing all messages, so I could imagine a nice way of doing that with your syntax.) –  F. Hauri Dec 25 '12 at 14:05
1  
...cleaner and more efficient... if all message have to be printed at least on time or more; Your way run translation when setting variable, when mine run translation when used... More or less, depending on what, when and how... –  F. Hauri Dec 25 '12 at 14:20
    
You can probably mix $"..." and $'...' for the desired effect. msg=$'Written by %s.\n'; echo $"$msg" –  tripleee Jan 1 '13 at 17:54
    
@tripleee And what if message contain backticks? Try: msg="$(msgunfmt /usr/share/locale/fr/LC_MESSAGES/coreutils.mo | sed -ne '/missing character class/s/^.* "\(.*\)"/\1/p')" –  F. Hauri Jan 3 '13 at 20:37
    
@tripleee (copy) Thanks to everyone. (My bounty will go to gniourf_gniourf unless best answer in 8 hours. But thanks to techno too, I like your lPrintf! ) –  F. Hauri Jan 3 '13 at 21:22
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