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Is I define a global pointer(char*). Then give an address of a constant string. Is this address will be freeed. for example:

static char *str;    
const char * test()
{
    str = "hello world";
    return str;
}

Q1: Now is it safe to use the content of the address get by test anywhere.
Q2: If the test is in a DLL. Is it safe to use out side by other program
Q3: If it's safe . When I reassign another const string to variable str. Will the old const string be freeed

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you do the following, you can use the result of foo() anywhere. You should not modify or free it however. It is irrelevant if this code is part of a DLL or a Library.

const char * foo() {
    return "hello";
}

// This is identical.
const char * foo() {
    const char *x = "hello";
    return x;
}

If you want to be able to modify, you could do something like this. Note that every call to foo() will be referring to the same piece of memory because x is static. Note that here, you can modify x, but you still should not free it.

char * foo() {
    static char x[] = "hello";
    return x;
}

If you wanted to be able to free the result of foo(), you must allocate the space with malloc().

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When I reassign another const string to variable str. Will the old const string be freeed –  Samuel Dec 25 '12 at 6:40
    
No. You only free() memory that has been allocated to the heap. "hello" in any of the cases above, is not stored on the heap. It's stored in a static piece of memory. –  Bill Lynch Dec 25 '12 at 7:04
    
There is no pointer point to the "hello" string in the static piece of memory, if I reassign the str. If the old string is still stored in the static piece of memory, It'll waste the static piece of memory –  Samuel Dec 25 '12 at 7:22

If only from code perspective, this is safe. But you should make sure in test(), you can only assign a string const to str. If you do like following:

const char *test() {
  char somestr[somesize];
  str = somestr;
  return str;
}

That's still not safe.

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If the test is in a DLL. Is it safe to use out side by other program –  Samuel Dec 25 '12 at 3:14
    
Yes, it's still safe in DLL. –  Evan Li Dec 25 '12 at 3:15

The assignment to str isn't even necessary. Even without it, it would be safe to return the address of a string literal from a function and to subsequently use the string anywhere.

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It's safe if you assign a string literal to the pointer, but if you're going to do that it seems like it would be best to leave the function out of the picture entirely:

static char str[] = "hello world";

Then you could just use str like a static char * since arrays just decay to pointers.

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