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I'm reading the perlipc perldoc and was confused by the section entitled "Interactive Client with IO::Socket". It shows a client program that connects with some server and sends a message, receives a response, sends another message, receives a response, ad infinitum. The author, Tom Christiansen, states that writing the client as a single-process program would be "much harder", and proceeds to show an implementation that forks a child process dedicated to reading STDIN and sending to the server, while the parent process reads from the server and writes to STDOUT.

I understand how this works, but I don't understand why it wouldn't be much simpler (rather than harder) to write it as a single-process program:

while (1) {
    read from STDIN
    write to server
    read from server
    write to STDOUT
}

Maybe I'm missing the point, but it seems to me this is a bad example. Would you ever really design an client/server application protocol where the server might suddenly think of something else to say, interjecting characters onto the terminal where the client is in the middle of typing his next query?

UPDATE 1: I understand that the example permits asynchronicity; what I'm puzzled about is why concurrent I/O between a CLI client and a server would ever be desirable (due to the jumbling of input and output of text on the terminal). I can't think of any CLI app - client/server or not - that does that.

UPDATE 2: Oh!! Duh... my solution only works if there's exactly one line sent from the server for every line sent by the client. If the server can send an unknown number of lines in response, I'd have to sit in a "read from server" loop - which would never end, unless my protocol defined some special "end of response" token. By handling the sending and receiving in separate processes, you leave it up to the user at the terminal to detect "end of response".

(I wonder whether it's the client, or the server, that typically generates a command prompt? I'd always assumed it was the client, but now I'm thinking it makes more sense for it to be the server.)

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1  
Depends on the protocol. Your code only works if the protocol is perfectly synchronous. The code in perlipc can handle something more asynchronous. –  ikegami Dec 25 '12 at 4:32
    
Please see update 1. –  Chap Dec 25 '12 at 18:32
    
ssh, telnet, HTTP with Keep-Alive, ..., single-threaded servers with multiple simultaneous clients. –  ikegami Dec 26 '12 at 15:17
    
But the protocol between each client and the server is synchronous, I believe. Are the ssh & telnet clients capable of simultaneously receiving from, and sending to, the servers? –  Chap Dec 26 '12 at 16:48
    
No, that's not the case for any of the three I mentioned. Those are examples of asynchronous protocols. –  ikegami Dec 26 '12 at 17:01

1 Answer 1

Because the <STDIN> read request can block, doing the same thing in a single process requires more complicated, asynchronous handling of the input/output functions:

while (1) {
    if there is data in STDIN
       read from stdin
       write to server
    if there is data from server
       read from server
       write to STDOUT
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please see update 1. –  Chap Dec 25 '12 at 18:32

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