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I'm trying to do do the following:

GetString(
    inputString,
    ref Client.WorkPhone)

private void GetString(string in, ref string out)
{
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(in))
    {
        out = in;
    }
}

This is giving me a compile error. I think its pretty clear what I'm trying to achieve. Basically I want GetString to copy the contents of an input string to the WorkPhone property of Client.

Is it possible to pass a property by reference?

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5  
I wrote up a pretty crappy example with silly errors, but you guys answered my underlying question in regards to passing properties by reference, thanks. –  yogibear Sep 10 '09 at 0:31
    
As to why, see this stackoverflow.com/questions/564557/… –  nawfal Feb 11 '13 at 12:04
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7 Answers

up vote 126 down vote accepted

Properties cannot be passed by reference. Here are a few ways you can work around this limitation.

1. Return Value

string GetString(string input, string output)
{
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(input))
    {
        return input;
    }
    return output;
}

void Main()
{
    var person = new Person();
    person.Name = GetString("test", person.Name);
    Debug.Assert(person.Name == "test");
}

2. Delegates

void GetString(string input, Func<string> getOutput, Action<string> setOutput)
{
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(input))
    {
        setOutput(input);
    }
}

void Main()
{
    var person = new Person();
    GetString("test", () => person.Name, value => person.Name = value);
    Debug.Assert(person.Name == "test");
}

3. Linq Expressions

void GetString<T>(string input, T outObj, Expression<Func<T, string>> outExpr)
{
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(input))
    {
        var expr = (MemberExpression) outExpr.Body;
        var prop = (PropertyInfo) expr.Member;
        prop.SetValue(outObj, input, null);
    }
}

void Main()
{
    var person = new Person();
    GetString("test", person, x => x.Name);
    Debug.Assert(person.Name == "test");
}
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9  
Solution 3 is such a nice trick :-) –  Bjarke Ebert Mar 21 '12 at 13:00
1  
OMG... I'm jealous. You're gonna get rich with this solution. –  NestorArturo May 2 '12 at 15:24
4  
In solution 2, the 2nd parameter getOutput is unnecessary. –  Jaider Nov 5 '12 at 17:00
8  
And I think a better name for the solution 3 is Reflection. –  Jaider Nov 5 '12 at 17:07
1  
Solution 3 using reflection AND Linq expressions is very elegant and did the job nicely. 4 years later and still well done :) –  TrueBlueAussie Jun 6 '13 at 13:40
show 2 more comments

without the duplicating the property

void Main()
{
    var client = new Client();
    NullSafeSet("test", s => client.Name = s);
    Debug.Assert(person.Name == "test");

    NullSafeSet("", s => client.Name = s);
    Debug.Assert(person.Name == "test");

    NullSafeSet(null, s => client.Name = s);
    Debug.Assert(person.Name == "test");
}

void NullSafeSet(string value, Action<string> setter)
{
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
    {
        setter(value);
    }
}
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+1 for changing the name GetString to NullSafeSet, because the former makes no sense here. –  Camilo Martin Feb 11 '13 at 7:57
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This is covered in section 7.4.1 of the C# language spec. Only a variable-reference can be passed as a ref or out parameter in an argument list. A property does not qualify as a variable reference and hence cannot be used.

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Another trick not yet mentioned is to have the class which implements a property (e.g. Foo of type Bar) also define a delegate delegate void ActByRef<T1,T2>(ref T1 p1, ref T2 p2); and implement a method ActOnFoo<TX1>(ref Bar it, ActByRef<Bar,TX1> proc, ref TX1 extraParam1) (and possibly versions for two and three "extra parameters" as well) which will pass its internal representation of Foo to the supplied procedure as a ref parameter. This has a couple of big advantages over other methods of working with the property:

  1. The property is updated "in place"; if the property is of a type that's compatible with `Interlocked` methods, or if it is a struct with exposed fields of such types, the `Interlocked` methods may be used to perform atomic updates to the property.
  2. If the property is an exposed-field structure, the fields of the structure may be modified without having to make any redundant copies of it.
  3. If the `ActByRef` method passes one or more `ref` parameters through from its caller to the supplied delegate, it may be possible to use a singleton or static delegate, thus avoiding the need to create closures or delegates at run-time.
  4. The property knows when it is being "worked with". While it is always necessary to use caution executing external code while holding a lock, if one can trust callers not to do too do anything in their callback that might require another lock, it may be practical to have the method guard the property access with a lock, such that updates which aren't compatible with `CompareExchange` could still be performed quasi-atomically.

Passing things be ref is an excellent pattern; too bad it's not used more.

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Some code would be cool.. :) –  nawfal Jan 1 at 1:23
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This is not possible. You could say

Client.WorkPhone = GetString(inputString, Client.WorkPhone);

where WorkPhone is a writeable string property and the definition of GetString is changed to

private string GetString(string in, string current) { 
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(in)) {
        return in;
    }
    return current;
}

This will have the same semantics that you seem to be trying for.

This isn't possible because a property is really a pair of methods in disguise. Each property makes available getters and setters that are accessible via field-like syntax. When you attempt to call GetString as you've proposed, what you're passing in is a value and not a variable. The value that you are passing in is that returned from the getter get_WorkPhone.

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What you could try to do is create an object to hold the property value. That way you could pass the object and still have access to the property inside.

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