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mysql> select * from emp;

    +-----+---------+------+------+------+
    | eno | ename   | dno  | mgr  | sal  |
    +-----+---------+------+------+------+
    |   1 | rama    |    1 | NULL | 2000 |
    |   2 | kri     |    1 |    1 | 3000 |
    |   4 | kri     |    1 |    2 | 3000 |
    |   5 | bu      |    1 |    2 | 2000 |
    |   6 | bu      |    1 |    1 | 2500 |
    |   7 | raa     |    2 | NULL | 2500 |
    |   8 | rrr     |    2 |    7 | 2500 |
    |   9 | sita    |    2 |    7 | 1500 |
    |  10 | dlksdgj |    2 |    2 | 2000 |
    |  11 | dlksdgj |    2 |    2 | 2000 |
    |  12 | dlksdgj |    2 |    2 | 2000 |
    |  13 | dlksdgj |    2 |    2 | 2000 |
    |  14 | dlksdgj |    2 |    2 | 2000 |
    +-----+---------+------+------+------+

Here is my table. I want to eliminate or prevent insertion of the duplicate records, as the eno field is auto increment total row never be duplicate, but the records are duplicates. How can I prevent inserting those duplicate records,

i tried using INSERT IGNORE AND ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE (I think I have not used them properly).

The way i used them is,

mysql> insert into emp(ename,dno,mgr,sal) values('dlksdgj',2,2,2000);
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.03 sec)

mysql> insert ignore into emp(ename,dno,mgr,sal) values('dlksdgj',2,2,2000);
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.03 sec)

mysql> insert into emp(ename,dno,mgr,sal) values('dlksdgj',2,2,2000) ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE eno=eno;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.03 sec)
mysql> insert into emp(ename,dno,mgr,sal) values('dlksdgj',2,2,2000) ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE eno=eno;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.04 sec

mysql> desc emp;
+-------+-------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field | Type        | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+-------+-------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| eno   | int(11)     | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| ename | varchar(50) | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| dno   | int(11)     | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| mgr   | int(11)     | YES  | MUL | NULL    |                |
| sal   | int(11)     | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+-------+-------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

can anybody give me a solution on this regard?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
can you post the result of this query DESC Employee? –  John Woo Dec 25 '12 at 6:06
    
what is the column(s) you want values to be unique? –  John Woo Dec 25 '12 at 6:08
    
can anybody give me any other more optimized query for this..?? –  Chella Sep 10 '13 at 6:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

alter the table by adding UNIQUE constraint

ALTER TABLE employee ADD CONSTRAINT emp_unique UNIQUE (ename,dno,mgr,sal)

but you can do this if the table employee is empty.

or if records existed, try adding IGNORE

ALTER IGNORE TABLE employee ADD CONSTRAINT emp_unique UNIQUE (ename,dno,mgr,sal)

UPDATE 1

Something went wrong, I guess. You only need to add unique constraint on column ename since eno will always be unique due to AUTO_INCREMENT.

In order to add unique constraint, you need to do some cleanups on your table.

The queries below delete some duplicate records, and alters table by adding unique constraint on column ename.

DELETE a
FROM Employee a
     LEFT JOIN
     (
        SELECT ename, MIN(eno) minEno
        FROM Employee
        GROUP BY ename
     ) b ON a.eno = b.minEno
WHERE b.minEno IS NULL;

ALTER TABLE employee ADD CONSTRAINT emp_unique UNIQUE (ename);

Here's a full demonstration

share|improve this answer
    
is there any other way ...than using this unique key constraint as I dont have permission to change the table structure...can't I eliminate it before inserting itself without using unique –  Chella Dec 25 '12 at 6:20
    
uhmm, I think, none since you have no privilege on altering the table. the only way to do that is to check it against the table for record existence. –  John Woo Dec 25 '12 at 6:21
    
yes exactly how could I do that..? –  Chella Dec 25 '12 at 6:22
    
you can check the record by executing this query first SELECT COUNT(*) totalCount FROM emp WHERE ename = 'nameHere'", if the result is greater than or equal to 1, then the value existed. –  John Woo Dec 25 '12 at 6:23
1  
Thank you very much..! –  Chella Dec 25 '12 at 6:47

Create a UNIQUE CONSTRAINT on which you think the duplicacy exist .

like

ALTER TABLE MYTABLE ADD CONSTRAINT constraint1 UNIQUE(column1, column2, column3)
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