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Suppose I have a collection of strings.

List<string> lines = new List<string>(File.ReadAllLines("Test.txt"));

And a regular expression to search for a match in that collection:

Regex r = new Regex(@"some regular expression");

How can I get the indeces of elements, matching the regex?

I have three ideas.


1st:

var indeces1 = lines.Where(l => r.IsMatch(l))
                    .Select(l => lines.IndexOf(l));
foreach (int i in indeces1)
{
    Console.WriteLine(i);//Do the index-based task instead...
}

What I don't like about it, is using IndexOf over the original collection. Am I wrong and it's OK?


var indeces2 = lines.Select((l, i) => new { Line = l, Index = i })
                    .Where(o => r.IsMatch(o.Line));

foreach (var o in indeces2)
{
    Console.WriteLine(o.Index);//Do the index-based task instead...
}

It seems to be better than the 1st one, but is there a way to do the same thing without creating an anonymous object?


And the last one:

for (int i = 0; i < lines.Count; i++)
{
    if (r.IsMatch(lines[i]))
    {
        Console.WriteLine(i);//Do the index-based task instead...
    }
}

Actually I have this one working now. But as I do love LINQ, I wanted to have a LINQ way to do the same.

So is there a better LINQ way to do this simple task?

share|improve this question
1  
If you just need indices then why don't you try .Select(t => t.Index); in your option 2. (at the end) to get IEnumerable<int> of indices only. You will get rid of the Anonymous object –  Habib Dec 25 '12 at 6:09
2  
@Habib it's worth to be an answer here as well as Cuong Le's post. Thanks –  horgh Dec 25 '12 at 6:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you love LINQ, you can use Enumerable.Range for simpler:

var indexes = Enumerable.Range(0, lines.Count)
                        .Where(i => r.IsMatch(lines[i]));

Edit:

Instead of using File.ReadAllLines to get all lines into memory:

List<string> lines = new List<string>(File.ReadAllLines("Test.txt"));

If your file is large, you should consider to use ReadLines which is deferred execution for more efficient:

var lines = File.ReadLines("C:\\Test.txt"));
share|improve this answer
2  
+1: always forget about Enumerable.Range...thanks for File.ReadLines I'll consider using it. –  horgh Dec 25 '12 at 6:20

If you just need indices then why don't you try .Select(t => t.Index); in your option 2. (at the end) to get IEnumerable of indices only. You will get rid of the Anonymous object.

So your query would be:

var indeces2 = lines.Select((l, i) => new { Line = l, Index = i })
        .Where(o => r.IsMatch(o.Line))
        .Select(t => t.Index);
share|improve this answer
    
+1: Actually your comment gave me this idea (very close to what Cuong Le showed): lines.Select((l, i) => i).Where(i => r.IsMatch(lines[i])) –  horgh Dec 25 '12 at 6:25

In this case I would go with your humble iterator version:

for (int i = 0; i < lines.Count; i++)
{
    if (r.IsMatch(lines[i]))
    {
        Console.WriteLine(i);//Do the index-based task instead...
    }
}

For this scenario, LINQ does not really reduce the line count and increase readability, in comparisson to option 3. So I would go for the simplest version in this case.

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