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What is the benefit to using a ‘get function’ for a python class?

I just started to read Python, but I wonder why does Python need setter and getter at all? it already have object variables which act like property

Consider

class C(object):
    def _init_(self):
        self._x = None

    def get_x(self):
        return self._x

    def set_x(self, value):
        self._x = valu
    x = property(get_x, set_x)

Can we just use C.x = "value" to do what we want to do here? what is the benefit of property?

BTW, creating property/setter/getter in this way is cumbersome to me, is there any way to simplify this? like

class C()
   has_attributes("x", "y", "z")
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marked as duplicate by BrenBarn, Donal Fellows, int3, Stony, Anand Dec 25 '12 at 10:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
You don't need getters and setters in Python. –  David Robinson Dec 25 '12 at 6:13
    
In addition to what brenbarn posted, consider Python @property versus getters and setters –  Burhan Khalid Dec 25 '12 at 6:29
    
Also note that you may want to not initialize self._x to None, so as to catch problems with code that tries to access it before it is set. In this case, you may not even need to define __init__(). –  EOL Dec 25 '12 at 6:46

3 Answers 3

You can use a property to obtain what you want:

class C(object):
    def _init_(self):
        self._x = None
    @property
    def x(self):
        return self._x

    @x.setter
    def x(self, value):
        self._x = value

Then you can access the attribute with the usual attribute syntax:

c = C()
c.x = 10    #calls the setter
print(c.x)  #calls the getter

There are some reasons to use a property instead of a plain data attribute:

  • You can document the attribute
  • You can control the access to the attribute, either by making it read-only or by checking the type/value being set
  • You do not break backwards compatibility: if something was a plain instance attribute and then you decide to transform it into a property the code that worked with the attribute will still work. If you used get/set explicit methods all the code that used the old API would have to change
  • It's more readable then using explicit get/set methods.
share|improve this answer
class C(object):
    def _init_(self):
        self._x = None

    def get_x(self):
        return self._x

    def set_x(self, value):
        self._x = value

    x = property(get_x, set_x)

now you can use c.x = "foo" with the set and gets, transparently.

The purpose of a set and getter is don't expose the class internals.

Imagine that in the future

self._x 

changes to

sql.save(id(self), value)

and get_x to:

value= sql.sql(id(self))
return convertFromDbFormatToExpectedApiFormat(value)

You will only have to change the code of getter and setters in only that class, not change all the classes that communicates with it.

class C(object):
    def _init_(self):
        self.sql = DDBB()

    def get_x(self):
        dbregistry = self.sql.fetch(id(self))
        return convertFromDbFormatToExpectedApiFormat(dbregistry)

    def set_x(self, value):
        self.sql.save(id(self), value)

    x = property(get_x, set_x)
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Your advice is applicable to Java, but Python callers would not have any trouble with a class that converted an attribute "x" to a property "x" implemented with "get_x" and "set_x". –  Paul McGuire Dec 25 '12 at 9:20
    
I'm not fully understanding your argument... Could elaborate? I think is more clear use get and set and property when you need do some non-trivial logic, and use decorator @property only if expected trivial, if any, logic. Also explicit setter and getter is more legible for multi-language developers, and (at least ver. 2.7) openly elaborated in the python docs. –  Jorge Díaz Díaz Dec 25 '12 at 15:15
1  
If your only behavior in assigning to the x property to call set_x to set object._x, just define the attribute as x and assign to it directly as object.x. If things change in the future (such as adding db persistence as you describe), then implement the setters and getters. No change needed in the callers - they used to set the attribute with sth.x = 100, and the new code will be sth.x = 100 - hey! no change after all! (Unlike Java, in which this kind of change, while syntactically the same, requires client code to recompile.) –  Paul McGuire Dec 25 '12 at 20:29
    
Phillip Eby may have explained this better in dirtsimple.org/2004/12/python-is-not-java.html –  Paul McGuire Dec 25 '12 at 20:30

Use plain attributes:

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.x = None

Later, when and if it would be necessary, x can be changed to a property. The beauty of "@property" it that is allows developer not to use getters, setters and "@property".

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