Sign up ×
Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other. Join them; it only takes a minute:

I would like to know the merits & de-merits of

  • Google Protocol Buffers
  • JSON
  • XML

I want to implement one common framework for two application, one in Perl and second in Java. So, would like to create common service which can be used by both technology i.e. Perl & Java.

Both are web-applications.

Please share me your valuable thoughts & suggestion on this. I have seen many links on google but all have mixed opinions.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Barmar, Mario Sannum, John Gietzen, Kim Stebel, Stony Dec 25 '12 at 19:41

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

And you think there's likely to be a concensus here? – Barmar Dec 25 '12 at 7:16
Thanks lot. But would like to know more Protocol Buffers vs JSON. – Manoj Kathiriya Dec 25 '12 at 7:24
@Barmar It' not about consensus, it's about rational choice, about pros and cons, it's good that the question was asked before the meta police started to lower the quality of SO content. – Boris Treukhov Nov 18 '14 at 6:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 119 down vote accepted


  • human readable/editable
  • can be parsed without knowing schema in advance
  • excellent browser support
  • less verbose than XML


  • human readable/editable
  • can be parsed without knowing schema in advance
  • standard for SOAP etc
  • good tooling support (xsd, xslt, sax, dom, etc)
  • pretty verbose


  • very dense data (small output)
  • hard to robustly decode without knowing the schema (data format is internally ambiguous, and needs schema to clarify)
  • very fast processing
  • not intended for human eyes (dense binary)

All have good support on most platforms.

Personally, I rarely use XML these days. If the consumer is a browser or a public API I tend to use json. For internal APIs I tend to use protobuf for performance. Offering both on public API (either via headers, or separate endpoints) works well too.

share|improve this answer
XML is more work to decode, but validation can be a major advantage over JSON. Validating your XML with a schema before you process a payment transaction it contains gives you an extra layer of robustness. – CC. Jul 11 '13 at 17:37
So it is hard to get comparably fast performance out of JSON to Protobuf? – Igor Ganapolsky May 19 '14 at 18:54
XML also allows a narrative style where text is alternated with tags inclusions like <value>This is a <attention>narrative style</attention>. Tags could appear <exclamation /> in the middle of text</value>. This is the unique feature of XML when compared with JSON and Protocol Buffers. – Paul Jun 16 '14 at 12:33
@Marc Gravell: How about in terms of forward-compatibility. It's my impression that this is one of protobuf's big selling points? – Thomas Ahle Jul 6 '14 at 16:47
@Thomas true, but there are json and xml serializers that support round-trip of unexpected data etc – Marc Gravell Jul 6 '14 at 17:22

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.