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I'm trying to use a custom widget with a GridLayout, but the result is always a really small grid in a corner, instead of a grid expanding in the whole window.

Sample code:

import kivy
kivy.require('1.5.1')

from kivy.app import App
from kivy.uix.button import Button
from kivy.uix.label import Label
from kivy.uix.widget import Widget
from kivy.uix.gridlayout import GridLayout



class MyWidget(Widget):
    def __init__(self):
        super(MyWidget, self).__init__()

        grid_layout = GridLayout(cols=3)
        grid_layout.add_widget(Button(text='A'))
        grid_layout.add_widget(Button(text='B'))
        grid_layout.add_widget(Label(text='text'))
        grid_layout.add_widget(Label(text='other'))
        grid_layout.add_widget(Button(text='text'))
        self.add_widget(grid_layout)


class MyApp(App):
    def build(self):
        float = 
        return MyWidget()


MyApp().run()

Since Widget's default size_hint is (1,1) it should expand in the whole window, and the GridLayout also. Why is this not happening? How can I obtain the result I want?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
`class MyWidget(Widget):`

Your root widget is MyWidget which inherits from a Widget and not from one of the layouts and therefore does not control the size of it's children As mentioned here, "The size_hint is a tupple of values used by layouts to manage the size of their children".

Your root widget does take up the entire space of the window. You can test this by adding a Rectangle to the canvas of MyWidget like so ::

with self.canvas.before:
    Color(1,0,0,1)
    Rectangle(pos=self.pos, size=self.size)

You should get familiar with canvas, canvas.before and canvas.after. They are basically groups of instructions, the before group is drawn before the canvas instructions of the widget and after group after.

One key thing different in Kivy though is that widget's sizing/layout is delayed till next frame, so if you just add the above snippet to your code like so::

from kivy.app import App
from kivy.uix.button import Button
from kivy.uix.label import Label
from kivy.uix.widget import Widget
from kivy.uix.gridlayout import GridLayout
from kivy.graphics import *


class MyWidget(Widget):

    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        # I'd make sure to pass of kwargs through to the super
        # as there are widgets's that process their initial
        # arguments through.
        super(MyWidget, self).__init__(**kwargs)

        grid_layout = GridLayout(cols=3)
        grid_layout.add_widget(Button(text='A'))
        grid_layout.add_widget(Button(text='B'))
        grid_layout.add_widget(Label(text='text'))
        grid_layout.add_widget(Label(text='other'))
        grid_layout.add_widget(Button(text='text'))
        self.add_widget(grid_layout)
        with self.canvas.before:
            Color(1,0,0,1)
            Rectangle(pos=self.pos, size=self.size)


class MyApp(App):
    def build(self):
        return MyWidget()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    MyApp().run()

This would only display a red rectangle at the initial position and size of your widget, which at the time would be it's default pos and size a.k.a (0, 0) and (100, 100) respectively.

To make the red rect adhere to the size of the widget we should bind it's size to the size of the widget, like so::

...
        grid_layout.add_widget(Button(text='text'))
        self.add_widget(grid_layout)
        with self.canvas.before:
            Color(1,0,0,1)
            self.rect = Rectangle(pos=self.pos, size=self.size)
        self.bind(size=self.update_rect)

    def update_rect(self, instance, value):
        self.rect.pos = self.pos
        self.rect.size = self.size

class MyApp(App):
    def build(self):
...

As the output of the above code above will show, your widget is taking up the size of the entire window. However, this doesn't solve your issue and the child layout still remains at it's original pos & of it's original size. This is cause widgets don't control the size of their children as stated above.

You have two choices here, either update the size & pos of your widget's child/children like you update rect(would quickly get complicated with multiple children) or use one of the Layouts as your root widget.

This could also be done in kv like so::

from kivy.app import App
from kivy.uix.widget import Widget
from kivy.lang import Builder

Builder.load_string('''
# this is the rule for MyWidget that defines
# what MyWidget looks like i.e.drawing
# instructions and widgets etc 
<MyWidget>:
    canvas.before:
        Color:
            rgba: 1, 0, 0, 1
        Rectangle:
            # this implicitly binds the size of the
            # rect to the size of the widget
            size: self.size
            # self here still refers to the widget as Rectangle is only a
            # graphics instruction and not a widget
            pos: self.pos
    GridLayout:
        cols: 3
        # root here refers to the `MyWidget`, bind the size of the
        # GridLayout to the size of your root widget
        size: root.size
        Button:
            text: 'A'
        Button:
            text: 'B'
        Label:
            text: 'text'
        Label:
            text: 'other'
        Button:
            text: 'text'        
''')


class MyWidget(Widget):
    pass


class MyApp(App):
    def build(self):
        return MyWidget()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    MyApp().run()

The example above binds the size of the child to the size of it's parent widget. I'd still recommend using a layout as your root widget, and don't be hesitant of nesting layouts.

share|improve this answer
    
I still don't understand why they decided to do something like this. Anyway I solved adding an update_layout method and binding it like the Rectangle in your example. All my widgets will only have one child: a layout, and thus that solution is perfect. I hate using languages/designers to write the UI so at the moment I'm not interested in your second solution. –  Bakuriu Dec 25 '12 at 20:39
    
Well, whatever you want, but you should try using kvlang in the future, it makes everything easier, and much less messy code. –  Tshirtman Dec 26 '12 at 10:29
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