Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm performing JOIN from multiple tables to perform a faceted search. When avoiding the JOIN and dividing the query into two different ones I've noticed a big performance boost, so I assume my JOIN isn't optimized.

The structure:

-- tags
userId  |   tagId
1              3
1              4
2              3
2              9

-- search
userId   |   number  |   countryId   |   stateId ...  
1              13           221             55

-- countries
countryId     |  countryName   
221                 Somewhere

-- users
userId    |   profileImageLink
1         |   <photo link>

I'm trying to extract all users that have a tag, order according to search.number and bring meta data from other tables. The query:

SELECT 
    search.*, users.a, users.b, users.c, users.d, users.e, users.f, countries.location_country, states.location_state, cities.location_city 
FROM search 
RIGHT JOIN tags 
   ON search.user_id = tags.user_id 
LEFT JOIN users 
   ON users.user_id=search.user_id 
LEFT JOIN countries 
   ON countries.countryId=search.countryId 
LEFT JOIN states 
   ON states.countryId=search.countryId AND states.stateId=search.stateId 
LEFT JOIN cities 
   ON cities.countryId=search.countryId AND cities.stateId=search.stateId AND cities.cityId=search.cityId 
WHERE 
  tags.skillId =52772 
ORDER BY 
  search.number DESC LIMIT 0,200

I've noticed removing the JOIN to the users table (and doing that afterwards) makes the query much faster. How can I optimize it to work in the same query? I've tried changing the FROM to tags instead of search, but that didn't work...

This is what EXPLAIN shows:

id  select_type table   type    possible_keys   key key_len ref rows    Extra
1   SIMPLE  tags    ref skill_user,skillId  skill_user  4   const   184854  Using index; Using temporary; Using filesort
1   SIMPLE  search  eq_ref  user_id user_id 4   tags.user_id    1   
1   SIMPLE  countries   eq_ref  PRIMARY PRIMARY 2   search.countryId    1   
1   SIMPLE  states  eq_ref  PRIMARY,state   PRIMARY 3   search.stateId  1   
1   SIMPLE  cities  eq_ref  PRIMARY,city    PRIMARY 3   search.cityId   1   
1   SIMPLE  users   eq_ref  user_id user_id 4   search.user_id  1   

EXPLAIN without the LEFT JOIN users:

id  select_type table   type    possible_keys   key key_len ref rows    Extra
1   SIMPLE  tags    ref skill_user,skillId  skill_user  4   const   155870  Using index
1   SIMPLE  search  eq_ref  user_id user_id 4   tags.user_id    1   
1   SIMPLE  countries   eq_ref  PRIMARY PRIMARY 2   search.countryId    1   
1   SIMPLE  states  eq_ref  PRIMARY,state   PRIMARY 3   search.stateId  1   
1   SIMPLE  cities  eq_ref  PRIMARY,city    PRIMARY 3   search.cityId   1   

EXPLAIN of query suggested in answer:

id  select_type table   type    possible_keys   key key_len ref rows    Extra
1   SIMPLE  tags    index   NULL    userid_skill    8   NULL    22689539    Using where; Using index; Using temporary; Using filesort
1   SIMPLE  search  eq_ref  user_id user_id 4   tags.user_id    1   
1   SIMPLE  users   eq_ref  user_id user_id 4   search.user_id  1   
1   SIMPLE  countries   eq_ref  PRIMARY PRIMARY 2   search.countryId    1   
1   SIMPLE  states  eq_ref  PRIMARY,state   PRIMARY 3   search.stateId  1   
1   SIMPLE  cities  eq_ref  PRIMARY,city    PRIMARY 3   search.cityId   1   
share|improve this question
1  
Are your columns (on join-columns) properly indexed? Immaterial, I would suggest avoid so many joins. I think splitting queries is a better idea when your data size is potentially going to grow. –  TJ- Dec 25 '12 at 10:20
    
index your join columns and maybe the where columns in your where clauses ... not sure if what i proposed is recommended –  cristi _b Dec 25 '12 at 10:23
1  
Can you post the "explain" result of your query? Just add EXPLAIN key word in front of your query –  sdespont Dec 25 '12 at 10:23
    
@sdespont Added the EXPLAIN output to the question –  Noam Dec 25 '12 at 10:29
    
A wrong index is possibly selected: skill_user instead of skillId. Which means that it's got to read all the tags and join all the rest. How many tags do you have with the skillId = 52772? A quick check can be done by adding FORCE INDEX(skillId) after RIGHT JOIN tags (I think). –  Artem Goutsoul Dec 25 '12 at 11:30

1 Answer 1

Create Indexes on Tables to run below query:

Table    ColumnName
------   ----------
tags     user_id, skillid (Both column in one index)

Try this:

SELECT s.*, u.a, u.b, u.c, u.d, u.e, u.f, c.location_country, 
       st.location_state, ct.location_city 
FROM tags t 
LEFT JOIN search s ON t.user_id = s.user_id 
LEFT JOIN users u ON t.user_id = u.user_id 
LEFT JOIN countries c ON s.countryId = c.countryId 
LEFT JOIN states st ON s.stateId = st.stateId 
LEFT JOIN cities ci ON s.cityId= ct.cityId 
WHERE t.skillId =52772 
ORDER BY s.number DESC 
LIMIT 0,200

EDIT

Try this two queries with proper index and let me know that below queries are work for you or not.

SELECT s.*, u.a, u.b, u.c, u.d, u.e, u.f, c.location_country, 
       st.location_state, ct.location_city 
FROM (SELECT user_id FROM tags WHERE t.skillId = 52772) AS t 
LEFT JOIN search s ON t.user_id = s.user_id 
LEFT JOIN users u ON t.user_id = u.user_id 
LEFT JOIN countries c ON s.countryId = c.countryId 
LEFT JOIN states st ON s.stateId = st.stateId 
LEFT JOIN cities ci ON s.cityId= ct.cityId 
ORDER BY s.number DESC 
LIMIT 0,200; 

OR

SELECT s.*, u.a, u.b, u.c, u.d, u.e, u.f, c.location_country, 
       st.location_state, ct.location_city 
FROM (SELECT t.user_id, s.* FROM tags t 
      LEFT JOIN search s ON t.user_id = s.user_id  
      WHERE t.skillId = 52772 
      ORDER BY s.number DESC 
      LIMIT 0,200) AS t 
LEFT JOIN users u ON t.user_id = u.user_id 
LEFT JOIN countries c ON s.countryId = c.countryId 
LEFT JOIN states st ON s.stateId = st.stateId 
LEFT JOIN cities ci ON s.cityId= ct.cityId 
ORDER BY s.number DESC 
LIMIT 0,200; 
share|improve this answer
    
When you run the query upload your output of EXPLAIN statement so I can upnderstand that it works on not –  Saharsh Shah Dec 25 '12 at 16:00
    
It's what I thought at first (changing the FROM), but it still does the same. I ran it again to make sure, and also the explain shows the same thing. And he doesn't use the index of both the columns although one exists –  Noam Dec 25 '12 at 16:14
    
Create merged index on both columns in sequence of user_id and skillid. and use that index in your query as LEFT JOIN search s USE INDEX (index_1) ON t.user_id = s.user_id. And update me on the same. –  Saharsh Shah Dec 25 '12 at 16:19
    
The index I had was skillId -> user_id, I added user_id -> skillId like you suggested and tried to inforce the use index, but the explain showed a much worse case (now going over 22M in first step using WHERE) –  Noam Dec 25 '12 at 19:23
    
Have you created a merged index or both are seperate index? –  Saharsh Shah Dec 26 '12 at 10:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.