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What does this tilde mean?

I am using IntelliJ and found that it can re-factor my code of the following

Handle<String> handle = new Handler<String>() {}

to Handler<String> handler = new Handler<~>() {}

what's the meaning of ~ in the above?

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marked as duplicate by badcat, Karna, Jan Dvorak, Bohemian, Jakub Arnold Dec 25 '12 at 12:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I guess this is a shortcut to "infer please" –  Jan Dvorak Dec 25 '12 at 11:56
    
are you sure it didnt just fold the duplicate generics declaration for a nicer result? –  radai Dec 25 '12 at 11:57
    
    
IntelliJ calls this feature "Automated code folding". –  irrelephant Dec 25 '12 at 12:01

3 Answers 3

In Java Handler handler = new Handler<~>() {} means syntax error, nothing else

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Even in Java 1.7? IntelliJ wouldn't recommend a syntax error. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 25 '12 at 11:57
1  
@JanDvorak In Java 7 you write <>, not <~>. –  nkr Dec 25 '12 at 11:58
    
As per the duplicate this seems like a IntelliJ-specific syntax that IntelliJ translates to valid java behind the scenes. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 25 '12 at 11:59
    
Technically correct but not a useful answer. -1 –  Jan Dvorak Dec 25 '12 at 12:02

This is a folding of the type arguments used by IntelliJ IDEA. It is a shorthand syntax for your viewing pleasure, not valid Java syntax.

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Now this I can upvote :-) even though just closing the question as duplicate would have been better. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 25 '12 at 12:04
    
@JanDvorak Closing as dup would have been better, true. 'Twas a gut response. –  Nathan Ryan Dec 25 '12 at 12:07
Handler<String> handler = new Handler<~>() {};

will not compile it has no meaning (except for eye-catching effect).

~ is Unary operator and it means Binary Ones Complement Operator it has the effect of 'flipping' bits. (~A ) will give -60 which is 1100 0011

EDIT

According to @Jan Dvorak, The question is incorrect in stating the IDE suggested this as a refactor.

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Technically correct but not a useful answer. -1; see the duplicate –  Jan Dvorak Dec 25 '12 at 12:02
    
what do you mean by useful? –  aviad Dec 25 '12 at 12:03
    
The tilde is not actually present in the source code so no syntax error happens. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 25 '12 at 12:04
    
Now read the question carefully and if you feel strange afterwards, feel free to take back your downvote :) –  aviad Dec 25 '12 at 12:05
    
The question is incorrect in stating the IDE suggested this as a refactor. Would you mind debunking that in your answer? –  Jan Dvorak Dec 25 '12 at 12:08

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