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In system we have methods that lock an object by specific params. As implementation, we have LockManager with Enter method that receives a key for a lock, check if lock object exists in internal dictionary, if not, it creates it and then locks.

What I want to do, is to set "X expected time" for specific lock, and if an object was locked for more that X time, I want to write a message to our log.

Below is a source code for my lock manager:

public class MyLockManager<T>
{
    protected Dictionary<T, object> LockDictionary { get; private set; }

    public MyLockManager()
    {
        LockDictionary = new Dictionary<T, object>();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Enters a lock on the key.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="key">The key to lock.</param>
    public virtual void Enter(T key)
    {
        if (!LockDictionary.ContainsKey(key))
        {
            lock (LockDictionary)
            {
                if (!LockDictionary.ContainsKey(key))
                {
                    LockDictionary.Add(key, new object());
                }
            }
        }

        object lockObj = LockDictionary[key];
        Monitor.Enter(lockObj);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Releases the lock on the key.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="key">The key to release.</param>
    public virtual void Exit(T key)
    {
        if (LockDictionary.ContainsKey(key))
        {
            Monitor.Exit(LockDictionary[key]);
        }
    }
}

Now I want to add an additional method, lets say LockTimoutHandler(T key) that will be called, if object for specific key was locked for more than X time.

In order to do it, I want to add some logic to "Enter" and "Exit" methods. When Enter called, something will be somehow registered to run the LockTimoutHandler in X time, and when "Exit" called, that something will be somehow unregistered.

My question is what I can use instead of that something? How I can schedule the method to run in X time and if Exit occurred before, so remove the schedule. It must be very fast, since performance is very important in our case. I know about Timer object...it can execute method in delayed manner, but is it's performance good enough? What additional options I have to achieve that?

NOTE: Just to be clear, I am not talking about TryEnter. I am not trying to catch the case when the object can not be locked for specific amount of time, I want to catch objects that already locked for too much time.

Thanks!

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1  
Your enter method is not thread safe. You may end up reading and writing from the dictionary at the same time in different threads. This may cause your application to deadlock. –  pstrjds Dec 25 '12 at 12:59
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

We had a similar rquirement and solved it this way:

  • When locking, set a timer to the timeout passing it a state object, that contains the key and a delegate whatever you desire: Logging, force-unlock, ... whatever is needed for your use case
  • When the timer fires, check for the key, if entry exists call delegate
  • Important: recycle the timer (e.q. in a threadsafe queue), do not let it go out of scope.
  • When you next need a timer, take one out of the recycle queue and manipulate the state object - only create a new one if you need to.

This will keep as many timers around as necessary, but no more and will incur the cost of allocation/deallocation only once. Since you can't change the timer's state object, you need to change its contents.

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And how I can "clear" the timer? I mean if object unlocked fast, I don't want to call that method. –  Alex Dn Dec 25 '12 at 12:27
    
Just let the timer fire! It will look up the key in the dictionary and not find it, thus doing nothing. Alternativly, since you don't store anything in the lock dictionary, you could also store a reference to the timer in it and use this to set it to infinity instead. –  Eugen Rieck Dec 25 '12 at 12:31
    
Ok, it looks like it acceptable solution that may work, but how about Timer performance and thread consuming? We have highly loaded application that handle vary many requests, I'm afraid that timer will decrease our performance too much. –  Alex Dn Dec 25 '12 at 12:34
1  
Our experience is, that the timer istself is very lightweight, as long as you avoid creation and destruction. If you are concerned about the wakeup/fire cycle, just set it to infinity (again a very cheap operation). The cheap cost of the timer is made possible by the inability to change the state object, which is the reson we must manipulate it, instead of exchanging it –  Eugen Rieck Dec 25 '12 at 12:38
    
just to make that more clear (sorry, english is not my first language): I mean to store the timer instead of new object()inside the dictionary and use it as a lock object. This might even offset part of the cost, as no new object is created and later GCed –  Eugen Rieck Dec 25 '12 at 12:40
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I think you can do it simpler. Timer is very light weight object and I wouldn't bare with trying to limit their count. All timers are running in a special thread from threadpool and they are really cheap.

Just create a dictionary of timers (if it will be used from different threads you may want to change it to ConcurrentDictionary:

var timers = new Dictionary<T, Timer>();

When adding item to your list use this code to setup timeout:

var timer = new Timer(o => LogMessage("key {0} is being held too long", key));
timer.Change(timeout, Timeout.Infinite);
timers.Add(key, timer);

Note that timer will be executed only once -- after specified timeout. And when item is released just remove timer from the dictionary:

Timer timer;
if (timers.TryGetValue(key, out timer))
{
    timer.Dispose();
    timers.Remove(key);
}
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