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I'm starting to study Python, and for now I like it very much. But, if you could just answer a few questions for me, which have been troubling me, and I can't find any definite answers to them:

  1. What is the relationship between Python's C implementation (main version from python.org) and IronPython, in terms of language compatibility ? Is it the same language, and do I by learning one, will be able to smoothly cross to another, or is it Java to JavaScript ?

  2. What is the current status to IronPython's libraries ? How much does it lags behind CPython libraries ? I'm mostly interested in numpy/scipy and f2py. Are they available to IronPython ?

  3. What would be the best way to access VB from Python and the other way back (connecting some python libraries to Excel's VBA, to be exact) ?

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CPython has more Excel libraries than IronPython: xlrd, xlutils, xlwt, openpyxl, pycel, pyxll, datanitro, xlwings, ExcelPython, expy – denfromufa Sep 10 '15 at 6:50

1) IronPython and CPython share nearly identical language syntax. There is very little difference between them. Transitioning should be trivial.

2) The libraries in IronPython are very different than CPython. The Python libraries are a fair bit behind - quite a few of the CPython-accessible libraries will not work (currently) under IronPython. However, IronPython has clean, direct access to the entire .NET Framework, which means that it has one of the most extensive libraries natively accessible to it, so in many ways, it's far ahead of CPython. Some of the numpy/scipy libraries do not work in IronPython, but due to the .NET implementation, some of the functionality is not necessary, since the perf. characteristics are different.

3) Accessing Excel VBA is going to be easier using IronPython, if you're doing it from VBA. If you're trying to automate excel, IronPython is still easier, since you have access to the Execl Primary Interop Assemblies, and can directly automate it using the same libraries as C# and VB.NET.

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Best answer so far. +1 – Vadim Sep 10 '09 at 2:53
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+1, but to be fair, ctypes is not all that different to use than the IronPython bridge to the CLR, so they have similar access to unwrapped external libraries. – Nick Bastin Sep 10 '09 at 3:50
    
Do you know if there is any way to automate Excel with IronPython using an add-in? I'd like to develop some add-ins this way to distribute to users without having to pay for the full Visual Studio just to get VSTO. – oob Mar 6 '11 at 2:24

What is the relationship between Python's C implementation (main version from python.org) and IronPython, in terms of language compatibility ? Is it the same language, and do I by learning one, will be able to smoothly cross to another, or is it Java to JavaScript ?

Same language (at 2.5 level for now -- IronPython's not 2.6 yet AFAIK).

What is the current status to IronPython's libraries ? How much does it lags behind CPython libraries ? I'm mostly interested in numpy/scipy and f2py. Are they available to IronPython ?

Standard libraries are in a great state in today's IronPython, huge third-party extensions like the ones you mention far from it. numpy's starting to get feasible thanks to ironclad, but not production-level as numpy is from IronPython (as witnessed by the 0.5 version number for ironclad, &c). scipy is huge and sprawling and chock full of C-coded and Fortran-coded extensions: I have no first-hand experience but I suspect less than half will even run, much less run flawlessly, under any implementation except CPython.

What would be the best way to access VB from Python and the other way back (connecting some python libraries to Excel's VBA, to be exact) ?

IronPython should make it easier via .NET approaches, but CPython is not that far via COM implementation in win32all.

Last but not least, by all means check out the book IronPython in Action -- as I say every time I recommend it, I'm biased (by having been a tech reviewer for it AND by friendship with one author) but I think it's objectively the best intro to Python for .NET developers AND at the same time the best intro to .NET for Pythonistas.

If you need all of scipy (WOW, but that's some "Renaissance Man" computational scientist!-), CPython is really the only real option today. I'm sure other large extensions (PyQt, say, or Mayavi) are in a similar state. For deep integration to today's Windows, however, I think IronPython may have an edge. For general-purpose uses, CPython may be better (esp. thanks to the many new features in 2.6), unless you're really keen to use many cores to the hilt within a single process, in which case IronPython (which is GIL-less) may prove advantageous again.

One way or another (or even on the JVM via Jython, or in peculiar environments via PyPy) Python is surely an awesome language, whatever implementation(s) you pick for a given application!-) Note that you don't need to stick with ONE implementation (though you should probably pick one VERSION -- 2.5 for maximal compatibility with IronPython, Jython, Google App Engine, etc; 2.6 if you don't care about any deployment options except "CPython on a machine under my own sole or virtual control";-).

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  1. IronPython version 2.0.2, the current release, supports Python 2.5 syntax. With the next release, 2.6, which is expected sometime over the next month or so (though I'm not sure the team have set a hard release date; here's the beta), they will support Python 2.6 syntax. So, less Java to JavaScript and more Java to J# :-)
  2. All of the libraries that are themselves written in Python work pretty much perfectly. The ones that are written in C are more problematic; there is an open source project called Ironclad (full disclosure: developed and supported by my company), currently at version 0.8.5, which supports numpy pretty well but doesn't cover all of scipy. I don't think we've tested it with f2py. (The version of Ironclad mentioned below by Alex Martelli is over a year old, please avoid that one!)
  3. Calling regular VB.NET from IronPython is pretty easy -- you can instantiate .NET classes and call methods (static or instance) really easily. Calling existing VBA code might be trickier; there are open source projects called Pyinex and XLW that you might want to take a look at. Alternatively, if you want a spreadsheet you can code in Python, then there's always Resolver One (another one from my company... :-)
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1) The language implemented by CPython and IronPython are the same, or at most a version or two apart. This is nothing like the situation with Java and Javascript, which are two completely different languages given similar names by some bone-headed marketing decision.

2) 3rd-party libraries implemented in C (such as numpy) will have to be evaluated carefully. IronPython has a facility to execute C extensions (I forget the name), but there are many pitfalls, so you need to check with each library's maintainer

3) I have no idea.

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  1. CPython is implemented by C for corresponding platform, such as Windows, Linux or Unix; IronPython is implemented by C# and Windows .Net Framework, so it can only run on Windows Platform with .Net Framework. For gramma, both are same. But we cannot say they are one same language. IronPython can use .Net Framework essily when you develop on windows platform.
  2. By far, July 21, 2009 - IronPython 2.0.2, our latest stable release of IronPython, was released. you can refer to http://www.codeplex.com/Wiki/View.aspx?ProjectName=IronPython.
  3. You can access VB with .Net Framework function by IronPython. So, if you want to master IronPython, you'd better learn more .Net Framework.
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2  
"so it can only run on Windows Platform with .Net Framework" Not true. Thanks to the Mono project, IronPython, and, in fact, any .NET application (such as c#), can run on any supported platform, such as Mac or Linux, in addition to Windows. – nilamo Sep 10 '09 at 2:51
    
It is not really true that every .NET application can run on Mono. Take a look at MoMA to find out the possible issues: mono-project.com/MoMA – Nemanja Trifunovic Sep 11 '09 at 18:12

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