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From this code:

node[4] = {5,3,2,6};

neighbor[4] = {4,3,2,9};

I have to find:

node[0] ==match values from neighbor[0-3] and node[1] ==match values from neighbor[0-3]

node[1] ==match values from neighbor[0-3] and node[2] ==match values from neighbor[0-3]

node[2] ==match values from neighbor[0-3] and node[3]==match values from neighbor[0-3]

if any one of these satisfies, print element found else not...

I have tried this code, it results element found..

but when i keep node[4] same and neighbor [4] to be different values {4,9,7,9};

still I am getting the result as element found

#include<stdio.h>


int main()
{
    int node[4] = {5,3,2,6};
    int neighbor[4] = {4,3,2,9};
    int i,flag=0,k=0;

    for (k=0;k<3;k++){
        for (i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
            if ((node[k]==neighbor[i]) && (node[k+1]==neighbor[i]));
            flag=1;
            break;
        }
    }
    if (flag==0)
    printf("Element not found\n");
    else
    printf("Element  found\n");
}
share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "common value"? –  aland Dec 25 '12 at 14:16
    
There are no values that are the same in the two sets. –  Ben Ruijl Dec 25 '12 at 14:17
    
DO you want algorithm of doing it ? –  Omkant Dec 25 '12 at 14:18
    
sorry, there is some confusion, i will edit and repost .. –  Reshmy Dec 25 '12 at 14:23
1  
Please don't correct your error int the original question. That will make the good answers useless. –  wildplasser Dec 25 '12 at 14:35

2 Answers 2

you have a basic mistake

for (k=0;k<3;k++){
        for (i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
            if ((node[k]==neighbor[i]) && (node[k+1]==neighbor[i]));
            flag==1;
            break;
        }

correction

for (k=0;k<3;k++){
        for (i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
            if ((node[k]==neighbor[i]) && (node[k+1]==neighbor[i]));
            flag=1;
            break;
        }

the correction of the mistake flag=1;

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I have corrected those.. –  Reshmy Dec 25 '12 at 14:33
    
and you must initialize flag to 0 –  mosheovadi1 Dec 25 '12 at 14:35
    
and last sintext correction if(flag==0) –  mosheovadi1 Dec 25 '12 at 14:36
    
Thank you, I made the corrections but still output remains same if i have neighbor[4] = {4,3,2,9}; and neighbor[4] = {4,9,7,9}; –  Reshmy Dec 25 '12 at 14:44

Your problem is the ; after the if statement:

            if ((node[k]==neighbor[i]) && (node[k+1]==neighbor[i]));

That means the condition isn't being used and flag = 1; is always being run. Remove the ;

And you have to initialize flag to 0:

   int i,flag=0,k=0;

BTW: I'd double check your algorithm. node[0] ==match values from neighbor[0-3] and node[1] ==match values from neighbor[0-3] I read that as "if node 0 matches anything in neighbors, and if node 1 matches anything in neighbors"

but you have it coded as "if node X and node X+1 match the same one value in neighbors"


The algorithm that you want is pretty easy, to construct, if node[X] == anything in neighbor[] then check if node[x+1] == anything in neighbor[]

So to code that knowing that each array is 4 elements in the array you can do something like this note this is untested but it's a ball park idea:

int main()
{
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i<3; i++)  // loop from the [0]th to the [2]nd element
    {
        if(is_in_array(node[i], neighbor))   // if the element in node is anywhere in neighbor
            if(is_in_array(node[i]+1, neighbor)) {  // check the next element
                flag = 1;  // if both are in there set the flag
                break;     // and leave the loops early
            }
    } 

    // insert your "if flag print" logic here.

    return 0;
}

int is_in_array(int needle, int haystack[])
{
    int found_it = 0;
    int counter;
    for(counter = 0; counter < sizeof(haystack)/sizeof(int); counter++)
        if(haystack[counter] == needle)
            found_it = 1;
    return found_it;
}
share|improve this answer
    
but still the output remains same, for neighbor[4] = {4,3,2,9}; and neighbor[4] = {4,9,7,9}; –  Reshmy Dec 25 '12 at 14:53
    
Yes I need the code as I state in algorithm and that means I have code that wrongly, could you please suggest the code –  Reshmy Dec 25 '12 at 14:57
    
@Reshmy - See the second update for a better algorithm, this type of problem is really good for procedural programming, let me know if you have any questions –  Mike Dec 25 '12 at 20:48

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