Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to have graph similar to graph on the picture below. I want to achieve graph similar to cos/sin, but with a bit of randomness. Graph should never go over(100) or below(0) limit. Without randomness we can write function like this:

f(x)=cos(x)*50+50

Random graph

I'm looking for implementation in any language or just a simple explanation.

share|improve this question
    
For what purpose? This is a bit too open-ended ... –  RBarryYoung Dec 25 '12 at 17:06
    
@RBarryYoung generating random terrain for a simple game. –  user1188570 Dec 25 '12 at 17:07
    
Ah, OK. As I recall, random terrain is best generated as a combination of f(0) and f(1) processes ... –  RBarryYoung Dec 25 '12 at 17:09
    
Do you want a) to generate a set of points, b) an analytic function, c) a graphing tool? –  ja72 Dec 25 '12 at 20:23

5 Answers 5

So here is a code written in C#, it can be randomized more with random input values. I just give you some output with values to see if it's okay for you. Amplite can be modified for the cosinus and sinus values. The offset is added in the end (so min value is always 0) and the scaling is done to be sure the max value is 100. As you can see noise can be added to (figure 3, figure 4).

terr1: RandomTerrarain(1000, 4, 1, 10, 5, 0); Figure 1

terr2: RandomTerrarain(1000, 2, 3, -10, 5, 0); Figure 2

Hope this helps!

      private static Random rnd = new Random();
    private double[] RandomTerrarain(int length, int sinuses, int cosinuses, double amplsin, double amplcos, double noise)
    {
        if (length <= 0)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("length", length, "Length must be greater than zero!");
        double[] returnValues = new double[length];

        for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
        {
            // sin
            for (int sin = 1; sin <= sinuses; sin++)
            {
                returnValues[i] += amplsin * Math.Sin((2 * sin * i * Math.PI) / (double)length);
            }
            // cos
            for (int cos = 1; cos <= cosinuses; cos++)
            {
                returnValues[i] += amplcos * Math.Cos((2 * cos * i * Math.PI) / (double)length);
            }
            // noise
            returnValues[i] += (noise * rnd.NextDouble()) - (noise * rnd.NextDouble());
        }
        // give offset so it be higher than 0
        double ofs = returnValues.Min();
        if (ofs < 0)
        {
            ofs *= -1;
            for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
            {
                returnValues[i] += ofs;
            }
        }
        // resize to be fit in 100
        double max = returnValues.Max();
        if (max >= 100)
        {
            double scaler = max / 100.0;
            for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
            {
                returnValues[i] /= scaler;
            }
        }
        return returnValues;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
[Figure 5] dl.dropbox.com/u/64369382/terr.png –  kurtyka Dec 25 '12 at 18:22

You can simply sum a few sin/cos with random coefficients and periods.

Implementation example:

internal struct SineWave
{
    internal readonly double Amplitude;
    internal readonly double OrdinaryFrequency;
    internal readonly double AngularFrequency;
    internal readonly double Phase;
    internal readonly double ShiftY;

    internal SineWave(double amplitude, double ordinaryFrequency, double phase, double shiftY)
    {
        Amplitude = amplitude;
        OrdinaryFrequency = ordinaryFrequency;
        AngularFrequency = 2 * Math.PI * ordinaryFrequency;
        Phase = phase;
        ShiftY = shiftY;
    }
}

public class RandomCurve
{
    private SineWave[] m_sineWaves;

    public RandomCurve(int components, double minY, double maxY, double flatness)
    {
        m_sineWaves = new SineWave[components];

        double totalPeakToPeakAmplitude = maxY - minY;
        double averagePeakToPeakAmplitude = totalPeakToPeakAmplitude / components;

        int prime = 1;
        Random r = new Random();
        for (int i = 0; i < components; i++)
        {
            // from 0.5 to 1.5 of averagePeakToPeakAmplitude 
            double peakToPeakAmplitude = averagePeakToPeakAmplitude * (r.NextDouble() + 0.5d);

            // peak amplitude is a hald of peak-to-peak amplitude
            double amplitude = peakToPeakAmplitude / 2d;

            // period should be a multiple of the prime number to avoid regularities
            prime = Utils.GetNextPrime(prime);
            double period = flatness * prime;

            // ordinary frequency is reciprocal of period
            double ordinaryFrequency = 1d / period;

            // random phase
            double phase = 2 * Math.PI * (r.NextDouble() + 0.5d);

            // shiftY is the same as amplitude
            double shiftY = amplitude;

            m_sineWaves[i] =
                new SineWave(amplitude, ordinaryFrequency, phase, shiftY);
        }
    }

    public double GetY(double x)
    {
        double y = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < m_sineWaves.Length; i++)
            y += m_sineWaves[i].Amplitude * Math.Sin(m_sineWaves[i].AngularFrequency * x + m_sineWaves[i].Phase) + m_sineWaves[i].ShiftY;

        return y;
    }
}

internal static class Utils
{
    internal static int GetNextPrime(int i)
    {
        int nextPrime = i + 1;
        for (; !IsPrime(nextPrime); nextPrime++) ;
        return nextPrime;
    }

    private static bool IsPrime(int number)
    {
        if (number == 1) return false;
        if (number == 2)  return true;

        for (int i = 2; i < number; ++i)
            if (number % i == 0) return false;

        return true;
    } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
with random periods too, I assume? –  RBarryYoung Dec 25 '12 at 17:10
    
@RBarryYoung, yes. –  Nikolay Khil Dec 25 '12 at 17:11

For your function, you can use Math class and Cos() method.

public static double GetCosFunction(double d)
{
     return Math.Cos(d) * 50 + 50;
}

For graph solution, you can check these topics;

share|improve this answer
    
I think that you misunderstand the question. He was not asking how to graph that function, he was asking how to make that function more random. –  RBarryYoung Dec 25 '12 at 17:22
    
What is that mean "making function more random" ? Functions works clear input and clear output. How could be a function more random works only with an expression called cos(x)*50+50 ? Please light me.. –  Soner Gönül Dec 25 '12 at 17:25
1  
He wants a function similar to that function but that has some randomness to it. –  RBarryYoung Dec 25 '12 at 17:42

Forgot this....

terr3: RandomTerrarain(1000, 5, 5, -2, 5, 2); Figure 3

terr4: RandomTerrarain(1000, 4, 1, 5, -20, 1); Figure 4

share|improve this answer

Have a look at xkcd-style graphs, a method to add random noise to a graph and smooth it in a way to make it look hand-drawn, imitating the style of the xkcd cartoons. Whilst this isn't exactly what you want, I think simply setting the input graph to zero (e.g. y=0) and tweaking the noise smoothing parameters to much larger noise amplitude and much larger smoothing distance will probably result in the kind of random graph you are looking for.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.