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I want to allocate memory for a struct that contains an array of another struct named table. I detected that when assigning the pointers to the functions at the end, the variables in the linkedObjects array get corrupted so i think my handling of dynamic memory is wrong.

This is how i'm doing it now:

typedef struct Object {
    void *key;
    struct Object *top;
    struct Object *next;
} Object;

typedef struct Table{
    Object *linkedObjects;
    size_t size, originalSize;
    HashFcn hfun;
    PrintFcn pfun;
    ComparisonFcn fcomp;
} Table;

TableP CreateTable(size_t tableSize, HashFcn hfun, PrintFcn pfun, ComparisonFcn fcomp)
{
    int i;
    struct Table *table = malloc(sizeof(table));
    if (table==NULL)
    {
        ReportError(MEM_OUT);
        return NULL;
    }
    table->linkedObjects = NULL;
    table->linkedObjects  = malloc(tableSize * sizeof(Object));

    for(i=0;i<tableSize;i++)
    {

        table->linkedObjects[i].next = malloc( MAX_IN_LIST*sizeof(Object) );
        table->linkedObjects[i].top = malloc( MAX_IN_LIST*sizeof(Object) );
        table->linkedObjects[i].key = NULL;
        table->linkedObjects[i].top->key = NULL;
        table->linkedObjects[i].next->key = NULL;

        if (table->linkedObjects[i].next == NULL)
        {
            ReportError(MEM_OUT);
            return NULL;
        }
    }

    table->size = tableSize;
    table->originalSize = tableSize;
    table->hfun = hfun;
    table->pfun = pfun;
    table->fcomp = fcomp;
    return table;
}

Edit: I edited the function code to reflect the answers:

TableP CreateTable(size_t tableSize, HashFcn hfun, PrintFcn pfun, ComparisonFcn fcomp)
{
    int i;
    struct Table *table = malloc(sizeof(table));
    if (table==NULL)
    {
        ReportError(MEM_OUT);
        return NULL;
    }
    table->linkedObjects = NULL;
    table->linkedObjects  = malloc(tableSize * sizeof(Object));

    if (table->linkedObjects == NULL)
    {
        ReportError(MEM_OUT);
        return NULL;
    }

    for(i=0;i<tableSize;i++)
    {
        table->linkedObjects[i].next = NULL;
        table->linkedObjects[i].top = NULL;
        table->linkedObjects[i].key = NULL;
    }

    table->size = tableSize;
    table->originalSize = tableSize;
    table->hfun = hfun;
    table->pfun = pfun;
    table->fcomp = fcomp;
    //printf("%p\n", table->hfun);
    return table;
}

but still when i get to the point of the assignments at the end, the table->linkedObjects[0].key that is null and value is 0x0 get's overrun to a value 0x8048cc0. This occurs when this line is executed:

table->originalSize = tableSize;

Another Edit: Confirmed that it happens randomly in the last calls (not only in the line above):

table->size = tableSize;
table->originalSize = tableSize;
table->hfun = hfun;
table->pfun = pfun;
table->fcomp = fcomp;
share|improve this question
    
are you meaning to give next and top large amount of memory? From my understanding those object should only need to store one struct in them, unless next and top are arrays in themselves. –  Gmercer015 Dec 25 '12 at 17:32
    
no i won't need alot of memory, just as you said - one struct –  Tom Dec 25 '12 at 17:36
    
at the moment next and top are independent arrays holding their own set of objects, is this on purpose? I'm trying to understand what you're trying to do here. I would guess next and top should be apart of an array key –  Gmercer015 Dec 25 '12 at 17:37
    
next and top are pointers to a struct –  Tom Dec 25 '12 at 17:39
    
top and next are mysterious. What do they do? Why are you allocating an array for each one, and only initializing one field of the first object? Other than that I don't see anything particularly wrong with this code. The error may well be elsewhere. Well, unless MAX_IN_LIST is 0, in which case that's just wrong. –  n.m. Dec 25 '12 at 17:41
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

struct Table *table = malloc(sizeof(table));

should be

struct Table *table = malloc(sizeof(Table));

I sometimes love C.

`

share|improve this answer
    
CONFIRMED. spent 2 hours on this and would never caught this without help from a different eye, thank you! –  Tom Dec 25 '12 at 18:29
2  
Firstly, either struct Table *table = malloc(sizeof(struct Table)) or Table *table = malloc(sizeof(Table)). Make up your mind and stick to it. Secondly, I'd say it should be struct Table *table = malloc(sizeof *table). Don't use type names when you don't have to. –  AndreyT Dec 25 '12 at 18:31
    
There are lots of possibilities, yeah. I would say typedef struct table_t Table. I would not use malloc(sizeof *var) but rather ((T*)malloc(sizeof(T))), wrapped in a macro, as in GNU libiberty. Macros are evil but some things are even more evil. But whatever melts your butter. –  n.m. Dec 25 '12 at 19:20
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table->linkedObjects[i].next = malloc( MAX_IN_LIST*sizeof(Object) );
table->linkedObjects[i].top = malloc( MAX_IN_LIST*sizeof(Object) );

This doesn't seem to make sense. When I see next or top with collections, I expect a single pointer to one Object (to the next item in the collection or to the first item in the collection).

Did you mean to do the following:

for(i=0;i < (tableSize-1);i++)
{
    table->linkedObjects[i].top = table->linkedObjects[0];
    table->linkedObjects[i].next = table->linkedObjects[i+1];
    table->linkedObjects[i].key = NULL;
}

This will allocate memory for each Object, and sets up the pointers afterwards.

share|improve this answer
    
i'm already doing that allocation but would it allocate memory for each object also? –  Tom Dec 25 '12 at 17:47
    
Oh, I didn't see that. You don't need to allocate memory for top or next, as you already have allocated those in the array itself. You are using the pointers to point back to certain elements in the array. If you were to allocate extra memory and use new Objects for each pointer, it won't point where you are expecting it. You want it to point the ones in the array, not to newly allocated ones. –  Femaref Dec 25 '12 at 17:59
    
i want everything to be null but it should have enough memory later on. Please review my edit –  Tom Dec 25 '12 at 18:03
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As usual, get rid of the habit of using type names under sizeof. This is how your memory allocations should have looked

Table *table = malloc(sizeof *table);
...
table->linkedObjects = malloc(tableSize * sizeof *table->linkedObjects);

That would also fix the "typo" error in the first allocation.

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