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If a class has an instance field that implements IDisposable then the containing class implements IDisposable and class that fields Dispose method from within its Dispose method.

public class A : IDisposable 
{
    public System.Drawing.Font font = new Font("Arial", 10.0f);

    public void Dispose()
    {
        font.Dispose()
    }
}

(I know I didn't do the dispose pattern correctly, but for sample code should be good enough)

If the field is a static field though where should the call to the field's Dispose be?

public class B
{
    public static System.Drawing.Font font = new Font("Arial", 10.0f);
}

I could make class B implement IDisposable and have that call font.Dispose but if B.font is used again later on that would cause problems. As well as you'd have to remember that dispise accessing a static method you need to create an instance just to call Dispose.

I could also make a static Dispose method but then users have to remember to call Dispose and have to make sure they're the last user of it in the program.

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7  
There's no such thing as a "static object", so the question is meaningless. –  Jon Skeet Dec 25 '12 at 18:16
    
your question is general. try to specific it. –  AmirHossein Mehrvarzi Dec 25 '12 at 18:18
    
Woops, typed there. Thanks for the catch –  shmuelie Dec 25 '12 at 18:18
    
In some cases you need to override that. –  AmirHossein Mehrvarzi Dec 25 '12 at 18:19
1  
It's not clear what you're asking now. Did you try the obvious approach of A.font.Dispose()? If not, why not? –  Jon Skeet Dec 25 '12 at 18:27
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Static fields are initialised when the type is loaded.

Therefore it logically it makes sense to dispose the object assigned to the static field when the containing type is unloaded.

However, types are not unloaded. There may be some exotic complication here around AppDomains, but I suspect that doesn't apply in your case.

Therefore I wouldn't dispose the instance, otherwise you will have a publicly available instance of an object that is unfit for use.

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3  
I like the logic. Dispose only when the type is unloaded. Types are never unloaded. Therefore, don't dispose. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 25 '12 at 19:20
    
But still, if the static field is not readonly, when it is reassigned, it might be a good idea to dispose the old instance, as I wrote in my answer. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 25 '12 at 20:22
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You dispose of it like any other object. It doesn't make a difference. A static object is just an object that is available per class. It's still an instance of something. Granted, you probably wouldn't want to do this since after you dispose of it someone can still access it and get a ObjectDisposedException exception.

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        using (Test.Instance)
        {

        }  

        Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10));
    }

    public class Test:IDisposable
    {
        public static Test Instance = new Test();
        public void Dispose()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Disposed");
        }
    }

And the output is:

Disposed

Per your updated example:

public class A
{
    public static System.Drawing.Font font = new Font("Arial", 10.0f));
}

You can just do A.font.Dispose() or using(A.font)

In general I think the idea is you really wouldn't have a public static disposable field since by making it static you imply it should be around for the lifetime of the application. If it has to be disposable you should could make it lazy and make it be thread-safely re-initializable, otherwise accessing it after disposing will throw exceptions. Or you can have a hook into your application end code and safely dispose of all static disposables there. You can register your disposable on start somewhere as well. Just an idea

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Your first example doesn't make much sense to me. Can Instance field only be read once? Because after using (Test.Instance) { ... } the object is disposed (and therefore presumably no longer usable), so if someone says Test.Instance a second time they get a "broken" object that has already been disposed. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 25 '12 at 19:03
    
I was just answering what the original question was asking, not saying it's the right thing to do. –  devshorts Dec 25 '12 at 19:06
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If the field is static, then maybe the intention is to have it last for the complete duration of the application? Because then it will only need to be disposed of when the application shuts down. And that will happen one way or the other, by itself-

If you plan to reassign the static field to different IDisposable objects several times during the lifetime of the application, then of course you would want to dispose the old object when you reassign. Maybe you could use a property for that? Not that I have thought a lot about it, but something like:

// private - don't write to this field from outside the property setter
static Font font = new Font("Arial", 10.0f));

public static Font Font
{
  get
  {
    return font;
  }
  set
  {
    var oldFont = font;
    if (oldFont != null)
      oldFont.Dispose();
    font = value;
  }
}
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You can't dispose a static class because there is no instance of it

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1  
Note that no one is going to know to call A.Dispose(), because it simply isn't done. –  cHao Dec 25 '12 at 18:32
    
State yourself clearer –  iPHAnTom Dec 25 '12 at 18:38
1  
Simply put, (1) IDisposable is meant for disposing instances, not whole classes. While you could have a static Dispose that disposes every static member, (2) the semantics of Dispose are such that whatever you Dispose is now a useless husk, and should not be used for anything else. Disposing a whole class? Ehhh.... –  cHao Dec 25 '12 at 18:47
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