Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Is there a more elegant way of doing the bit size selection and pseudo-random binary bit generation than I am doing here? Actually I need to write an algorithm where the user is in control of the bit size (max 16 bit) of the random binary bit generated. This is the function I wrote however I am not sure if this is the smallest/most elegant. As this is scientific in need efficiency doesn't matter much but elegance of code and easy understandability does matter. So is there a more efficient/elegant way of doing the same?

static string randomBit() {
    int bitSize = 0, input = 0;
    Console.Write("Input Bit Size (Maximum is 16 Bit): ");
    input = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
    Random choice = new Random();
    if(input == 0 || input > 16) {
        bitSize = 0;
    }
    else if(input == 1) {
        bitSize = 1;
    }
    else if(input == 2) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(2, 3);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 3) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(4, 7);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 4) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(8, 15);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 5) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(16, 31);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 6) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(32, 63);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 7) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(64, 127);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 8) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(128, 255);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 9) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(256, 511);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 10) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(512, 1023);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 11) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(1024, 2047);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 12) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(2047, 4095);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 13) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(4096, 8191);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 14) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(8192, 16383);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 15) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(16384, 32767);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    else if(input == 16) {
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(32768, 65535);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }
    string binary = Convert.ToString(bitSize, 2);
    return binary;
}

Also as a second question, if I press Enter twice when the code is asking for bit size, it returns an exception error. Is there a way to bypass the same?

share|improve this question
3  
Why are you insisting on a value of (say) 8 or more if the bit size is 4? You're basically removing one bit of randomness by forcing the most significant bit to be 1. (You should ask your second question as a second question, by the way.) –  Jon Skeet Dec 25 '12 at 19:19
    
Good point Jon.. ;) –  Mike Dinescu Dec 25 '12 at 19:26
    
you can also use Int32.TryParse dotnetperls.com/int-tryparse for second question –  Amitd Dec 25 '12 at 19:31
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". –  John Saunders Dec 25 '12 at 19:39
1  
@Jeet.Deir: A random number of 4 bits should have 16 possible values - 0000 to 1111, with all values feasible, not just 1000 to 1111. –  Jon Skeet Dec 25 '12 at 22:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First of all, I really think you can reduce the number of if/else statements:

private static string randomBit()
{
    int bitSize = 0, input = 0;
    Console.Write("Input Bit Size (Maximum is 16 Bit): ");
    input = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
    Random choice = new Random();

    if (input <= 0 || input > 16)
    {
        bitSize = 0;
    }
    else if(input == 1)
    {
        bitSize = 1;
    }
    else
    {                        
        int randomChoice = choice.Next(1 << (input-1), (1 << input)-1);
        bitSize = randomChoice;
    }

    string binary = Convert.ToString(bitSize, 2);
    return binary;
}

If you're not comfortable with the left shifts in this expression: int randomChoice = choice.Next(1 << (input-1), (1 << input)-1); and you're interested more in readability then you could always replace that with:

int randomChoice = choice.Next(Math.Pow(2, input - 1), Math.Pow(2, input) - 1);

As far as the question regarding the exception, the answer is yes. The problem you have is that you don't validate the input to the Convert.ToInt32 function.

Instead of input = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine()); you could write:

do
{
   string inputString = Console.ReadLine();
   if(!Int32.TryParse(inputString, out input))     // will return false if it can't convert
   {
       Console.WriteLine("Please enter a number between 1 and 16!");
       input = 0;
   }
}while(input == 0);
share|improve this answer
    
Can you please explain this statement a bit? else { int randomChoice = choice.Next(1 << (input-1), (1 << input)-1); –  Jeet.Deir Dec 25 '12 at 19:14
    
The left shift operator (<<) will shift all bits of the variable on the left, to the left, by as many positions as indicated by the value on the right. In the 1 << input example, you are essentially moving bit 0 of 0x00000001 to the left input number of positions - which incidentally corresponds to powers of 2. You can look this up further (ask another question) or use the other statement I showed in the answer (see my answer) :) –  Mike Dinescu Dec 25 '12 at 19:24
    
Thank you very much ! I would really love to learn about the shift operators. Power is what we use, but shifting is something new for me. Should I ask a fresh question? Also, small query, to use the pow function wont I need a double rather than an int? Thanks. –  Jeet.Deir Dec 25 '12 at 19:34
    
@Jeet.Deir - if you found the answer helpful you can always show your appreciation by up-voting/marking as answer ;) As for Math.Pow - no, the compiler will handle the cast for you. For more info on shift operators, after doing a Google search I recommend asking a fresh question with details of exactly what you'd like to know.. –  Mike Dinescu Dec 25 '12 at 19:37
    
You were most helpful Miky but I can't up-vote an answer as I have reps < 15 :( . Sorry for that. –  Jeet.Deir Dec 25 '12 at 19:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.