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Can different source code generate the same executable/binary file?

Is this possible?

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1  
Trivially if I just rename all the variable. Or are you asking abut more meaningful changes? – dmckee Sep 10 '09 at 4:40
    
meaningful changes – newer Sep 10 '09 at 4:44
    
Since the two programs compile to the same executable, I'd think the intent would be the same in the two source code files, so the differences wouldn't be too meaningful, would they? just differences in expression. Unless the targets were two different processors. :-) – Nosredna Sep 10 '09 at 4:52
    
what i meant was 2 programs that do different things. can they have the same binary file? – newer Sep 10 '09 at 4:54
1  
Only if they run on different processors or virtual machines. – Nosredna Sep 10 '09 at 4:55

Yes. Compilers can make a lot of optimizations, and different source code can map to the same object code. Here are a couple trivial examples. Note that these are language-dependent.

  • You can express an integer in decimal, hex, octal, or binary--the result in the object code will be the same.
  • In many languages, the variable names do not appear in the executable, and you can change the names of variables without affecting the executable.
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Yes. For example

int nabs1(int a){ 
  return -abs(a); 
}

int nabs2(int a){ 
  return(a<0) ? a : -a;
}

gcc -O6 generates the same code:

 _nabs1:
pushl	%ebp
movl	%esp, %ebp
movl	8(%ebp), %edx
popl	%ebp
movl	%edx, %eax
sarl	$31, %eax
xorl	%eax, %edx
subl	%edx, %eax
ret
.p2align 4,,15
.globl _nabs2
.def	_nabs2;	.scl	2;	.type	32;	.endef
_nabs2:
pushl	%ebp
movl	%esp, %ebp
movl	8(%ebp), %edx
popl	%ebp
movl	%edx, %eax
sarl	$31, %eax
xorl	%eax, %edx
subl	%edx, %eax
ret
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good example, maykeye – Nosredna Sep 10 '09 at 4:42

It depends on how you define similar. It would be possible to play with making tiny changes in Java or C# and have it generate to the same bytecode.

For example, in C, I expect that if I use a preprocessing command for a literal string, or use the literal string directly, that the generated code would be the same but the source was different.

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