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I wanted to get some feedback on the way I change/load pages on my site. I feel my method is somewhat unorthodox, sense I technically do not have separate files for each page, and need some advise.


I'm using get variables to change content, and mod_rewrite to pretty it up. So basically, in my site, the url:
www.mysite.com/content1
is equal to
www.mysite.com?content=content1
and
www.mysite.com/content2/2
is equal to
www.mysite.com?content=content2&page=2

Then within my body tag I use something like:

<?php
    $c = $_GET['content'];
    if($c == "contact")
    {
        include_once('contact.php');
    }
    else if($c == "about")
    {
        include_once('about.php');
    }
?>

Is there any downfall to the way I'm doing this?

Thanks in advance.

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closed as not constructive by Quentin, hakre, Jack, Peter O., Bhavik Ambani Dec 26 '12 at 1:50

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is nothing wrong with what you're doing. You can however dynamically include the files like so. This allows for a lot less code (just adding a filename to the $files array) when dealing with a lot of potential files.

$content = strtolower($_GET['content']);

$files = array('contact', 'about', 'other', 'another');

if(!in_array($content, $files)) {
    header("HTTP/1.0 404 Not Found");
    exit;
}

include_once($content . '.php');
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1  
This answer is better than the other one, because it provides whitelisting, and validation. Do not trust user input in any condition. –  Second Rikudo Dec 25 '12 at 20:41
    
Thank you, that's a great alternative. –  iRector Dec 25 '12 at 20:52
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Well, it depends.
If these pages are static ones - your setup is okay.

But it's usual dynamic PHP pages, showing different results based on input parameters, there is a serious breach in your design: you will be unable to alter header data, send custom HTTP header or send raw data instead of full HTML page on AJAX request.

So, though your whole idea is quite an "orthodox" one, and widely used, you have to change your design.
The code you posted should be placed not "inside your body tag" but before any output.
Included page should not print a single character either, but just prepare data.
Then? based on the program flow logic, it should send HTTP header, raw data or call a template, which will start output your header, body and footer.

Here is a similar question I've answered before: Using PHP include to separate site content — you will find full code there, showing the idea in motion.

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Thanks for that, I'm reading through it now. –  iRector Dec 25 '12 at 21:03
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