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I have a thread called TMyThread and I overrode the Execute procedure like this:

 procedure TMyThread.Execute;
 Begin
     repeat
     //Some Work 
     Sleep(5000);
     //Some Work 2;
     Sleep(5000); 
     until FActive=False
 End;

In the main form I have button called 'Destroy My Thread'. I want to destroy my thread but the problem is that my thread will be destroyed only if it finish its work. I want to destroy my thread even it has not finished its work. How do I do this?

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Check this out: stackoverflow.com/questions/4044855/… –  kostas Dec 25 '12 at 20:54
    
Check this: stackoverflow.com/questions/4044855/… –  kostas Dec 25 '12 at 20:55
4  
Technically that's possible, but it's a really bad idea. Don't kill threads, tell them to commit suicide. The correct solution is having your thread check a flag(such as the Terminated property) often enough. –  CodesInChaos Dec 25 '12 at 20:55
4  
And if you want your worker thread to sleep, don't use sleep, because the thread is not listening (to Terminated) during that time. Use Events and WaitForSingleObject as e.g. specified here: objectmix.com/delphi/402360-tthread-sleep-terminate.html (found when Googling "delphi terminate thread setevent") –  Jan Doggen Dec 25 '12 at 21:40
    
@Jan Doggen : Yes that's it .. using TEvent solve my problem .. thank you –  S.MAHDI Dec 26 '12 at 0:05
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3 Answers

Your thread's Execute method must regularly check the state of the thread's Terminated property. And if it is True, then the thread Execute method must exit.

So, a typical Execute method might look like this:

procedure TMyThread.Execute;
begin
  while not Terminated do
    DoNextPieceOfWork
end;

It looks like your thread has its own FActive flag that is performing the same task. The problem with that is that TThread doesn't know about it. So you should get rid of FActive and instead use the built in mechanism.

When you call Free on the thread it will call Terminate. That sets Terminated to be True. Then it waits for the thread method to exit. That will happen because your thread notices that Terminated is True and quits. And then the thread's destructor can continue and finish the job of tidying up the thread.


Looking at the code in your answer, it would be better written to make use of the existing Terminate mechanism.

type
  TMyThread = class(TThread)
  private
    FTerminateEvent: TEvent;
  protected
    procedure Execute; override;
    procedure TerminatedSet; override;
  public
    constructor Create(ACreateSuspended: Boolean);
    destructor Destroy; override;
  end;

constructor TMyThread.Create(ACreateSuspended: Boolean);
begin
  inherited Create(ACreateSuspended);
  FTerminateEvent := TEvent.Create(nil, True, False, '');
end;

destructor TMyThread.Destroy;
begin
  inherited;
  FTerminateEvent.Free;
end;

procedure TMyThread.TerminatedSet;
begin
  FTerminateEvent.SetEvent;
end;

procedure TMyThread.Execute;
begin
  while not Terminated do
  begin
    // do somthing interesting!
    FTerminateEvent.WaitFor(5000);
  end;
end;

Now there's no need for a separate Stop method. You can just call Free on the thread. Then Terminate is called. And then TerminatedSet is called. Then the event is signaled. Then Execute terminates. And then the thread can go away.


Having said that, I'm struggling to think of a scenario where a 5000ms timeout would be the best approach. I don't know why you are doing this, but I'd guess that you are trying to throttle the thread so that it doesn't run hot. You want to avoid a busy loop. That's admirable, but using a fixed timeout is not the way to do it. The way to do it is to wait on a synchronisation event, typically an event. Then when there is more work to be done, the event becomes signaled and your thread wakes up.

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i use FActive instead of Terminated –  S.MAHDI Dec 25 '12 at 20:55
    
David , I dont wana my thread to waits for the thread method (The work) to exit.. –  S.MAHDI Dec 25 '12 at 21:00
2  
The work code also needs to check for termination. –  David Heffernan Dec 25 '12 at 21:10
1  
So sad when you do all kinds of work to help someone, and provide the best possible solution from a professional experience standpoint, yet they go resort to some other nasty solution instead. –  Jerry Dodge Dec 26 '12 at 16:41
    
@Jerry I wouldn't say that. user has listened to all advice and just needs a couple of minor tweaks to be there. –  David Heffernan Dec 27 '12 at 8:06
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You really are approaching this problem completely wrong. Code your threads to only do work that you want them to do, and then there will be no need to "reach in from the outside" to control them. You feel the need to control this thread from the outside because it's doing something you don't want it to do -- well then why did you code it to do that in the first place?

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since i need to use Sleep Method as a time waiting before i do my work –  S.MAHDI Dec 25 '12 at 21:45
2  
You need interruptible sleep –  David Heffernan Dec 25 '12 at 22:30
2  
@user1720557: That's fine, then sleep. But when you wake up, make an intelligent decision about what to do next. –  David Schwartz Dec 25 '12 at 22:51
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using TEvent can solve this problem this is an eg :

  uses SyncObjs;
  TMyThread = class(TThread)
       private
         FTerminateEvent: TEvent;
       protected
         procedure Execute; override  ;
       public
        constructor Create(ACreateSuspended: Boolean); overload;
        destructor Destroy; override;
        procedure Stop;
       end;
    constructor TMyThread.Create(ACreateSuspended: Boolean);
    begin
    FTerminateEvent := TEvent.Create(nil, True, False, 'FTerminateEvent');
    inherited Create(ACreateSuspended);
    end;

    destructor TMyThread.Destroy;
    begin
     FTerminateEvent.Free;
     inherited;
    end;

    procedure TMyThread.Stop;
    begin
    Terminate;
    FTerminateEvent.SetEvent;
    end;

    procedure TMyThread.Execute;
    begin
      while not Terminated do
      begin
      // do somthing interesting!
       FTerminateEvent.WaitFor(5000);
      end;
    end;

Now if i want to kill my thread ,all what i have to do is calling MyThread.Stop than calling MyThread.Free .

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2  
Why did you select to implement your own parallel mechanism rather than using Terminate –  David Heffernan Dec 26 '12 at 7:58
1  
To be clear on how to do this, you need to override TThread.TerminatedSet and there call FTerminateEvent.SetEvent. And make sure that you free FTerminateEvent after you have called inherited Destroy. See my updated answer. –  David Heffernan Dec 26 '12 at 9:02
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