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I'm implementing a very simple computer algebra system in c. I have some problem with my program crashing after a while.

The idea is having an expression like 3^(21+8^(3^100)) + 4 and see that it equals 2 mod 7. I have already written the program in java and am trying to port it to c.

This is how I have done it: I have a struct named expr. It can either be a binary expression or an atomic int

struct expr
{
    struct expr* a;
    struct expr* b;
    char op;
    int value;
};
typedef struct expr expr;

expr* new_expr(int i)
{
    expr* e = malloc(sizeof(expr));
    e->op='i';
    e->value = i;
    return e;
}

expr* new_expr2(expr* a, expr* b, char op)
{
    expr* e = malloc(sizeof(expr));
    e->a=a;
    e->b=b;
    e->op=op;
    e->value = 0;
    return e;
}

void free_expr(expr* e)
{
    free_expr(e->a);
    free_expr(e->b);
    free(e);
}
/* ... other methods ... */

I suspect (one of) the problems is that I don't free memory in the gcd function. This is how I have written the gcd function.

expr* gcd(expr* a, expr* b)
{
    expr* t = b;
    while(!equals(b, zero))
    {
        t=b;
        b=mod(a, b);
        a=t;
    }
    return a;
}

this works great in java but I'm not sure if it works in c, because it doesn't have automatic garbage collection. I'm not sure how to structure it when the function is recursive. So I guess my question is, where should I put in the free_expr function? mod(a, b) allocates a new expr struct, so it will eventually create a lot of expr's that will never be free'd. I suspect this might be the reason that it crashes. What would be the right way to structure this? Or am I doing this all wrong?

I would much rather do the calculations in the struct expr than on int's because of code maintainablity.

Thanks for any help.

[edit] this is my mod function

expr* mod(expr* number, expr* modulo)
{
    expr* result;
    if(number->op=='i')
    {
        if(modulo->op=='i')
        {
            int i = (number->value)%(modulo->value);
            while(i<0)
            {
                i=i+(modulo->value);
            }
            return new_expr(i);
        }
    }
    switch(number->op)
    {
    case '+':
        result = new_expr(mod(number->a,modulo)->value+mod(number->b,modulo)->value);
        break;
    case '-':
        result = new_expr(mod(number->a,modulo)->value-mod(number->b,modulo)->value);
        break;
    case '*':
        result = new_expr(mod(number->a,modulo)->value*mod(number->b,modulo)->value);
        break;
    case '/':
        result = new_expr(mod(number->a,modulo)->value/mod(number->b,modulo)->value);
        break;
    case '^':
        result = modexpEuler(number->a,number->b, modulo);
        break;
    }
    (result->value)%=(modulo->value);
    return result;
}


expr* modexpEuler(expr* a, expr* b, expr* n)
{
if(!(a->op=='i')||!(n->op=='i'))
{
    printf("wrong input ");
    exit(0);
}

if(equals(b, one))
{
    return mod(a,n);
}
if(equals(b, zero))
{
    if(b->op=='^'){
        printf("adf %d\n",b->a->value);
        printf("asdf %d\n", b->b->value);
    }else{

        printf("asdf %c\n", b->op);
        printf("asdf %d\n", b->value);
        printf("asdf %d\n", a->value);
        printf("asdf %d\n", a->b->value);
    }
    return copy_expr(zero);
}
if(equals(mod(a, n), zero))
{
    return copy_expr(zero);
}
if(b->op == 'i')
{
    return expmod(a, b, n);
}
if(equals(gcd(a,n), one))
{
    expr* tempA = mod(a, n);
    expr* tempB = mod(b, phi(n));
    printf("trying to use euler\n");
    printf("%d\n",a->value);
    printf("%d\n",b->value);
    return modexpEuler(tempA, tempB, n);
}
else
{
    printf("gcd not 1 ");
    exit(0);
}

}

phi(n) calculates eulers totient function.

[edit 2] this is my eqauls

int equals(expr* a, expr* b)
{
    if((a->op)!=(b->op))
    {
        return 0;
    }
    if((a->op)=='i')
    {
        return (a->value)==(b->value);
    }else{
        return equals(a->a,b->a)&&equals(a->b,b->b);
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
first of: variables are not initialized in c. in new_expr you have to set a and b to 0 (or NULL) ... otherwise free will explode because random pointers are in a and b. Secondly can you please show the functions mod and equals, too? –  Ronny Brendel Dec 25 '12 at 21:36
    
and a second minor thing: you can write typedef struct {} expr; which is shorter ... but doesnt realler matter (It creates an anonymous/not-named) struct and typedefs it expr –  Ronny Brendel Dec 25 '12 at 21:43
1  
Note: the recursive call in mod() leaks memory for all operator-cases (except Euler) inside the switch. –  wildplasser Dec 25 '12 at 22:03
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3 Answers

In gcd, you have three expr*, namely a, b and t.

expr* gcd(expr* a, expr* b)
{
    expr* t = b;
    while(!equals(b, zero))
    {
        t=b;
        b=mod(a, b);

Now t points to what b pointed before, b points to the modulus, and a still points to what it pointed when the loop body was entered this iteration.

        a=t;

And that is now overwritten and becomes inaccessible. So the right time to free it would be just before that assignment. You can't free it before that, because it's still needed in mod(a, b). And you can't free it after, because you don't have a handle to it anymore then.

    }
    return a;
}

Note that the pointed-to structs passed in are thus destroyed in gcd, so if you need them outside the function after that, you should make (deep) copies.

The immediate reason for the segfault is probably

void free_expr(expr* e)
{
    free_expr(e->a);
    free_expr(e->b);
    free(e);
}

That one absolutely needs a NULL check. As is, you try to free_expr(0->a), which is undefined behaviour and almost certain to crash.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Am I understanding it right if I say it's a that should be freed? –  user1661303 Dec 28 '12 at 15:36
    
In the while loop? Yes, a is the pointer you lose in each iteration, so you should free it before you assign a = t; or you'll have a leak. But beware, that would free the memory pointed to by the caller's pointers. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 28 '12 at 15:46
add comment

Assuming mod is allocating a new expr then yes, there is a leak. I would probably pass in a third expr to take result whether than allocating one in mod. That allows your calling code to decide what to do memory-wise.

It might be useful to checkout valgrind by the way. It can be used to find memory problems, and it's quite easy to use for basic stuff.

share|improve this answer
add comment
typedef struct expr
{
    struct expr* a;
    struct expr* b;
    char op;
    int value;
} expr;

expr* new_expr(int i)
{
    expr* e = malloc(sizeof(expr));
    e->a=NULL                          <----
    e->b=NULL                          <----
    e->op='i';
    e->value = i;
    return e;
}

expr* new_expr2(expr* a, expr* b, char op)
{
    expr* e = malloc(sizeof(expr));
    e->a=a;
    e->b=b;
    e->op=op;
    e->value = 0;
    return e;
}

void free_expr(expr* e)
{
    if (e!=NULL) {
        free_expr(e->a);
        free_expr(e->b);
        free(e);
    }
}
/* ... other methods ... */

expr* gcd(expr* aa, expr* bb)
{
    expr *a = copy_of(aa), *b = copy_of(bb);
    expr* t = b;
    while(!equals(b, zero))
    {
        t=b;
        b=mod(a, b);
        free_expr(a);
        a=t;
    }
    free_expr(b);
    return a;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Okey, is it possible to do the gcd function without the pointers to pointers? I would like to do it like the mod function or equals function that just takes two pointers to an expr and returns a pointer to a expr. –  user1661303 Dec 28 '12 at 15:50
1  
wow I have done a mistake there. this code should be actually correct. In order to not modify a and b parameters you should copy them before using them, though. –  Ronny Brendel Dec 29 '12 at 9:36
    
Is it really necessary to copy a and b before I pass them to the gcd function? mod never changes any values in the expr struct. It just returns a new expr. –  user1661303 Dec 30 '12 at 12:47
    
never mind, I just realised freeing a in the gcd function changes it so I have to copy it. –  user1661303 Dec 30 '12 at 12:48
    
Somehow it feels unnecessary to copy a and b all the time, when it's only the original a and b that should be protected. Gcd will be called all the time, because it is recursive. Since mod also allocates on the stack, there will be a lot of allocations all the time. I'm thinking about making an outer gcd function that copies the original a and b and then an internal recursive function that calculates the actual values. Like this: –  user1661303 Dec 30 '12 at 14:08
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