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Hi I've got lots of folders with the name "@eaDir" all across one of my disks and I'd like to search through, find all of them and delete them and their contents.

I know this is probably a combination of the find and rm command but I can't quite figure them out. Can anyone help?

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2 Answers

Try this:

find . -type d -name '@eaDir' -print0 | xargs -rt0 rm -rv

Here's the same thing but using explicit long options for xargs:

find . -type d -name '@eaDir' -print0 | xargs --no-run-if-empty --verbose --null rm -rv

(using long options is always a good idea if you're writing scripts that will need to be maintained/reviewed by other people)

But before anything else:

man find
man xargs
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Why using a non-standard argument to find, find . -type d -name '@eaDir' -exec rm -rv {} \; is fine, no ? –  jfgagne Dec 26 '12 at 10:49
    
Yes, that's fine too. The difference is that with -exec option find will spawn a rm process for each directory found. With xargs the argument list for rm -rv is built, and then rm -rv [argument list here] is invoked once. –  dschulz Dec 27 '12 at 6:25
    
True, thanks for pointing out the difference. –  jfgagne Dec 27 '12 at 7:24
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find /path/to/the/disk -type d -name "@eaDir" -delete

Notice that the order here is fundamental: quoting the manpage,

Warnings: Don't forget that the find command line is evaluated as an expression, so putting -delete first will make find try to delete everything below the starting points you specified.

So, as always, first try your find command with -print, then, when you checked that everything works fine, replace it with -delete. Notice that -delete implies -depth, so, to do meaningful testing with -print, you should explicitly specify it in the expression:

When testing a find command line that you later intend to use with -delete, you should explicitly specify -depth in order to avoid later surprises.

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Right, but i'd be wary to use and recommend -delete. It has the potential to cause a disaster putting it in the wrong place/order. –  dschulz Dec 25 '12 at 23:56
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@dschulz: yes, the order thing here is fundamental, if you put it before the -name it will happily erase everything under the specified root. On the other hand, the usual rule about mass deletion and shell scripting applies here: first test with -print (echo), then put -delete (rm) in its place. –  Matteo Italia Dec 25 '12 at 23:59
    
This ends with the error for each non-empty folder to be deleted... –  Piotr Dobrogost Feb 4 at 10:18
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