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I'm trying to communicate with the Enttec USB DMX Pro. Mainly receiving DMX.

They released a Visual C++ version here, but I'm a little stumped on what to do to convert to Obj-c. Enttec writes, "Talk to the PRO using FTDI library for Mac, and refer to D2XX programming guide to open and talk to the device." Any example apps for Objective-C out there? Is there an easy way to communicate with the Enttec DMX USB Pro?

Thanks!

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The "drivers" you're talking about appear to be available at the FTDI Chip site and I don't know of any "Objective C" specific sample apps, but if you can any MacOS sample code that uses C or C++, that should also work within an Objective C app. –  Michael Dautermann Dec 26 '12 at 1:16
    
Yeah, I was trying to find a MacOS sample code in C or C++.... –  objectiveccoder001 Dec 26 '12 at 1:23
    
Not sure if it helps, but might be worth look at ofxDmx or the DMXusbPro cinder block –  George Profenza Nov 4 '13 at 21:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

I've done a significant amount of work with the FTDI chips on the Mac, so I can provide a little insight here. I've used the single-channel and dual-channel variants of their USB-serial converters, and they all behave the same way.

FTDI has both their Virtual COM Port drivers, which create a serial COM port on your system representing the serial connection attached to their chip, and their D2XX direct communication libraries. You're going to want to work with the latter, which can be downloaded from their site for various platforms.

The D2XX libraries for the Mac come in a standalone .dylib (the latest being libftd2xx.1.2.2.dylib) or a new static library they started shipping recently. Included in that package will be the appropriate header files you need (ftd2xx.h and WinTypes.h) as well.

In your Xcode project, add the .dylib as a framework to be linked in, and add the ftd2xx.h, WinTypes.h, and ftd2xx.cfg files to your project. In your Copy Bundled Frameworks build phase, make sure that libftd2xx.1.2.2.dylib and ftd2xx.cfg are present in that phase. You may also need to adjust the relative path that this library expects, in order for it to function within your app bundle, so you may need to run the following command against it at the command line:

install_name_tool -id @executable_path/../Frameworks/libftd2xx.1.2.2.dylib libftd2xx.1.2.2.dylib

Once your project is all properly configured, you'll want to import the FTDI headers:

#import "ftd2xx.h"

and start to connect to your serial devices. The example you link to in your question has a downloadable C++ sample that shows how they communicate to their device. You can bring across almost all of the C code used there and place it within your Objective-C application. They just look to be using the standard FTDI D2XX commands, which are described in detail within the downloadable D2XX Programmer's Guide.

This is some code that I've lifted from one of my applications, used to connect to one of these devices:

    DWORD numDevs = 0;
    // Grab the number of attached devices
    ftdiPortStatus = FT_ListDevices(&numDevs, NULL, FT_LIST_NUMBER_ONLY);
    if (ftdiPortStatus != FT_OK)
    {
        NSLog(@"Electronics error: Unable to list devices");
        return;
    }

    // Find the device number of the electronics
    for (int currentDevice = 0; currentDevice < numDevs; currentDevice++)
    {
        char Buffer[64];
        ftdiPortStatus = FT_ListDevices((PVOID)currentDevice,Buffer,FT_LIST_BY_INDEX|FT_OPEN_BY_DESCRIPTION); 
        NSString *portDescription = [NSString stringWithCString:Buffer encoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];
        if ( ([portDescription isEqualToString:@"FT232R USB UART"]) && (usbRelayPointer != NULL))
        {           
            // Open the communication with the USB device
            ftdiPortStatus = FT_OpenEx("FT232R USB UART",FT_OPEN_BY_DESCRIPTION,usbRelayPointer);
            if (ftdiPortStatus != FT_OK)
            {
                NSLog(@"Electronics error: Can't open USB relay device: %d", (int)ftdiPortStatus);
                return;
            }
            //Turn off bit bang mode
            ftdiPortStatus = FT_SetBitMode(*usbRelayPointer, 0x00,0);
            if (ftdiPortStatus != FT_OK)
            {
                NSLog(@"Electronics error: Can't set bit bang mode");
                return;
            }
            // Reset the device
            ftdiPortStatus = FT_ResetDevice(*usbRelayPointer);
            // Purge transmit and receive buffers
            ftdiPortStatus = FT_Purge(*usbRelayPointer, FT_PURGE_RX | FT_PURGE_TX);
            // Set the baud rate
            ftdiPortStatus = FT_SetBaudRate(*usbRelayPointer, 9600);
            // 1 s timeouts on read / write
            ftdiPortStatus = FT_SetTimeouts(*usbRelayPointer, 1000, 1000);      
            // Set to communicate at 8N1
            ftdiPortStatus = FT_SetDataCharacteristics(*usbRelayPointer, FT_BITS_8, FT_STOP_BITS_1, FT_PARITY_NONE); // 8N1
            // Disable hardware / software flow control
            ftdiPortStatus = FT_SetFlowControl(*usbRelayPointer, FT_FLOW_NONE, 0, 0);
            // Set the latency of the receive buffer way down (2 ms) to facilitate speedy transmission
            ftdiPortStatus = FT_SetLatencyTimer(*usbRelayPointer,2); 
            if (ftdiPortStatus != FT_OK)
            {
                NSLog(@"Electronics error: Can't set latency timer");
                return;
            }                   
        }
    }

Disconnection is fairly simple:

        ftdiPortStatus = FT_Close(*electronicsPointer);
        *electronicsPointer = 0;
        if (ftdiPortStatus != FT_OK)
        {
            return;
        }

Writing to the serial device is then pretty easy:

    __block DWORD bytesWrittenOrRead;
    unsigned char * dataBuffer = (unsigned char *)[command bytes];
    //[command getBytes:dataBuffer];
    runOnMainQueueWithoutDeadlocking(^{
        ftdiPortStatus = FT_Write(electronicsCommPort, dataBuffer, (DWORD)[command length], &bytesWrittenOrRead);
    });

    if((bytesWrittenOrRead < [command length]) || (ftdiPortStatus != FT_OK))
    {
        NSLog(@"Bytes written: %d, should be:%d, error: %d", bytesWrittenOrRead, (unsigned int)[command length], ftdiPortStatus);

        return NO;
    }

(command is an NSData instance, and runOnMainQueueWithoutDeadlocking() is merely a convenience function I use to guarantee execution of a block on the main queue).

You can read raw bytes from the serial interface using something like the following:

NSData *response = nil;
DWORD numberOfCharactersToRead = size;
__block DWORD bytesWrittenOrRead;

__block unsigned char *serialCommunicationBuffer = malloc(numberOfCharactersToRead);        

runOnMainQueueWithoutDeadlocking(^{
    ftdiPortStatus = FT_Read(electronicsCommPort, serialCommunicationBuffer, (DWORD)numberOfCharactersToRead, &bytesWrittenOrRead);
});

if ((bytesWrittenOrRead < numberOfCharactersToRead) || (ftdiPortStatus != FT_OK))
{
    free(serialCommunicationBuffer);
    return nil;
}

response = [[NSData alloc] initWithBytes:serialCommunicationBuffer length:numberOfCharactersToRead];
free(serialCommunicationBuffer);

At the end of the above, response will be an NSData instance containing the bytes you've read from the port.

Additionally, I'd suggest that you should always access the FTDI device from the main thread. Even though they say they support multithreaded access, I've found that any kind of non-main-thread access (even guaranteed exclusive accesses from a single thread) cause intermittent crashes on the Mac.

Beyond the cases I've described above, you can consult the D2XX programming guide for the other functions FTDI provides in their C library. Again, you should just need to move over the appropriate code from the samples that have been provided to you by your device manufacturer.

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WOW! Thank you very much, Brad. This is insanely helpful. +1 for sure! I really appreciate the response –  objectiveccoder001 Jan 22 '13 at 14:30
    
@Brad: Really great info. I am trying the same with J2DXX, iam able to communication to the device and retrieve device information and so on. But i am just puzzled because i don't see a method to say in which block of the mifare card should i write a data or so on... this api isn't gonna read or write to the mifare card right ?, but just for the reader device –  user2072922 Feb 14 '13 at 17:03
    
@inba - I have no idea how the MIFARE works, but the above is just how you send and receive data via the FTDI USB-serial converters. You're going to need to send whatever commands the MIFARE needs on your own. –  Brad Larson Feb 14 '13 at 17:20
    
very nicely explained and documented(+1). using c++ but with this information I could easily use the ftd2xx library. thanks! –  George Profenza Nov 4 '13 at 19:01

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