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In the following code snippet, there are three versions of a method named show().

package overloading;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public final class Main
{
    private void show(Object object)
    {
        System.out.println("Object");
    }

    private void show(List<Object> list)  //Unused method
    {
        System.out.println("List");
    }

    private void show(Object[] objects)
    {
        System.out.println("Objects");
    }

    private void addToList()
    {
        List<String>list=new ArrayList<String>();
        list.add("String1");
        list.add("String2");
        list.add("String3");
        show(list); // Invokes the first version

        String []s={"111", "222", "333"};
        show(s);   // Invokes the last version
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        new Main().addToList();
    }
}

In this simplest of Java code, this method call show(s); (the last line in the addToList() method) invokes the last version of the overloaded methods. It supplies an array of strings - String[] and it is accepted by the receiving parameter of type Object[].

This function call show(list); however attempts to invoke the first version of the overloaded methods. It passes a list of type strings - List<String> which should be accepted by the middle version whose receiving parameter is of type List<Object> The middle version of the methods is completely unused. It is a compile-time error, if the first version is removed.

Why does this call show(list); not invoke this version - private void show(List<Object> list){} - the middle one?

share|improve this question
    
+1. Interesting. Apparently, the compiler takes the generic type annotation into consideration and eliminates the overloaded method it would otherwise have chosen. I would have expected a compile error because the generic types don't match instead. If you remove the type annotation from list (make it List list), then the middle method does get chosen (with warnings and runtime error of course). –  Thilo Dec 26 '12 at 1:59
1  
The middle version is chosen when the generic type parameter with list is removed. –  Tiny Dec 26 '12 at 2:03
    
With autoboxing, varargs and generics, method dispatch has becoming really complex since Java 5. This makes for a great (or at least tricky) exam question. –  Thilo Dec 26 '12 at 2:05
1  
A good explanation of this is Brian Goetz's article Generic gotchas. –  Ted Hopp Dec 26 '12 at 2:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In short, List<Object> is NOT List<String>.

To "fix" your code, use the following code

private void show(List<? extends Object> list)
{
    System.out.println("List");
}

Unlike arrays (which are covariant in Java), different instantiations of a generic type are not compatible to each other, not even explicitly.

With the declaration Generic<Supertype> superGeneric; Generic<Subtype> subGeneric; the compiler would report a conversion error for both castings (Generic<Subtype>)superGeneric and (Generic<Supertype>)subGeneric.

This incompatibility may be softened by the wildcard if ? is used as actual type parameter: Generic<?> is the abstract supertype for all instantiations of the generic type.

Also see

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List<Object> is not a superclass of List<String> in java. What you are assuming is that Java has covariance on generics, which it does NOT.

What this means is that if A is a superclass of B, List<A> is NOT a superclass of List<B>

A similar problem is faced in Cannot convert generic to expanded nested type, You can see if any of the work arounds there works for you.

Perhaps changing

private void show(List<Object> list)

to

private void show(List<? extends Object> list)

Would work as you would expect?

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@Thilo why would there be an error? There might have been an error if the show(Object object) version did not exist. –  Karthik T Dec 26 '12 at 1:58
    
I would not have expected that List<Object> gets discarded as the best choice by the compiler. I would have expected it to still dispatch there (but then complain about the mismatch). That seems to be more predictable behaviour to me. I would not have expected generics to affect which methods gets chosen. But seems I was wrong. With autoboxing, varargs and generics, method dispatch has becoming really complex since Java 5. This makes for a great (or at least tricky) exam question. –  Thilo Dec 26 '12 at 2:01
    
@Thilo That is the reason for the failure, It would have been picked if list was a List<Object>, But since it is an UNRELATED type to List<Object>, it fails. If java supported covariance like Scala does, it would have worked. –  Karthik T Dec 26 '12 at 2:03
    
Yes, and since Java does not, I would have preferred a compile error to silently dispatching to the "wrong" method. –  Thilo Dec 26 '12 at 2:04
    
@KarthikT add something about u in your profile –  vels4j Dec 26 '12 at 2:06

I would say it is because the parameters are different, List <Object> Differs from List <String> Therefore when you call the overloaded method, it would default to the first one accepting just an Object.

Here is a short example:

public class Test
{
  public static void overload (Object o)
  {
    System.out.println ("Object");

  }

   public static void overload (List <Object> o)
  {
    System.out.println ("List Object");
  }

   public static void main (String [] args)
   {
     overload (new ArrayList <Object>()); //"List Object"
     overload (new ArrayList <String>()); //"Object"

   }
}

Parameterize the list with generics and everything should work.

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