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Whenever I run large scale monte carlo simulations in S-Plus, I always end up growing a beard while I wait for it to complete.

What are the best tricks for running monte carlo simulations in R? Any good examples of running processes in a distributed fashion?

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closed as too broad by Ben Bolker, Bill the Lizard Aug 4 at 18:12

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted
  • Using multiple cores/machines should be simple if you're just using parallel independent replications, but be aware of common deficiencies of random number generators (e.g. if using the current time as seed, spawning many processes with one RNG for each might produce correlated random numbers, which leads to invalid results - see e.g. this paper)

  • You might want to use variance reduction to reduce the number of required replications, i.e. to shrink the size of the required sample. More advanced variance reduction techniques can be found in many textbooks, e.g. in this one.

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Preallocate your vectors!

> nsims <- 10000
> n <- 100
> 
> system.time({
     res <- NULL
     for (i in 1:nsims) {
         res <- c(res,mean(rnorm(n)))
     }
 })
   user  system elapsed 
  0.761   0.015   0.783 
> 
> system.time({
     res <- rep(NA, nsims)
     for (i in 1:nsims) {
         res[i] <- mean(rnorm(n))
     }
 })
   user  system elapsed 
  0.485   0.001   0.488 
>
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i used this just yesterday in a model and it decreased my run time by >15%. Certainly worth a line of code. –  JD Long Sep 11 '09 at 15:23
    
that's a great little trick –  Dan Sep 11 '09 at 17:43

Latin Hypercube Sampling is easily applied and has a major influence on the results. Basically you take a latin hypercube sample from a uniform distribution (e.g., using randomLHS() in the package lhs) and transform this to your desired distribution using e.g., qnorm(uniformsample).

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I know this thread is really old, but if anyone stumbles upon it and is looking for an even faster method, I think the following works:

library(data.table)
library(microbenchmark)

nsims <- 10000
n <- 100

# Answer from @Eduardo_Leoni:
preallocate<-function(nsims, n) {
  res <- rep(NA, nsims)
  for (i in 1:nsims) {
    res[i] <- mean(rnorm(n))
  }
  return(res)
}

# Answer using data.table:
datatable<-function(nsims,n) {
  dt <- data.table(i=1:nsims)[,list(res=mean(rnorm(1:n))),by=i]
  return(dt)
}

# Timing benchmark:
microbenchmark(preallocate(nsims,n), datatable(nsims,n), times=100)
#Unit: milliseconds
#                  expr      min       lq   median       uq      max neval
# preallocate(nsims, n) 428.4022 432.3249 434.2910 436.4806 489.2061   100
#   datatable(nsims, n) 238.9006 242.3517 244.1229 246.5998 303.6133   100
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1  
You ought to run both your solution and the others on the same computer (since some computers are faster than others). I'm finding yours a little slower than the loop one with microbenchmark; and replicate(nsims, mean(rnorm(1:n))) a little faster. It's like a 3% difference in both cases. –  Frank Sep 2 '13 at 14:01
1  
Thanks for the suggestion, @Frank, and see the edited answer. On my system data.table is giving a ~1.8X speedup over the loop solution from @Eduardo_Leoni. Please let me know if I'm missing something, since I'm definitely not an expert on the nuances of benchmarking... –  dnlbrky Sep 7 '13 at 12:43
    
Very helpful. I reduced my computation time from 250 to 60 seconds using this tip. –  hubert_farnsworth Aug 4 at 3:20

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