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I have the following classes:

// -- model hierarchy
public interface IJob {
}

public abstract class AbstractJob : IJob {
}

public class FullTimeJob : AbstractJob {               
}

// -- dao hierarchy
public interface IJobDao<T> where T : IJob {       
  T findById(long jobId);
  long insert(T job);
}

public interface IFullTimeJobDao : IJobDao<FullTimeJob> {        
}

public abstract class AbstractDao {    
}

public abstract class AbstractJobDaoImpl<T> : AbstractDao, IJobDao<T> where T : IJob {
  public T findById(long jobId) {
    // omitted for brevity
  }

  public long insert(T job) {
    // omitted for brevity
  }
}

public class FullTimeJobDaoImpl : AbstractJobDaoImpl<FullTimeJob>, IFullTimeJobDao {
}

I'm calling the following code from a factory method, which does not seem to work:

public IJobDao<IJob> createJobDao(long jobDaoTypeId)
{
    object jobDao = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(FullTimeJobDaoImpl));
    return jobDao as IJobDao<IJob>; // <-- this returns null
    return (IJobDao<IJob>) jobDao; // <-- this cast fails
}

How is this "up cast" properly achieved?

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Now it does not compile –  horgh Dec 26 '12 at 3:26
    
Editied... Copied over from the other question. I was trying to simplify from the other question. –  Adam Levitt Dec 26 '12 at 3:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For this cast to be possible you'll need to mark the interface type parameter as out:

public interface IJobDao<out T> where T : IJob {...}

Then

object jobDao = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(FullTimeJobDaoImpl));
var r = jobDao as IJobDao<IJob>; //not null

But this brings some restrictions on the interface. Read out (Generic Modifier) (C# Reference) for more info.

In a generic interface, a type parameter can be declared covariant if it satisfies the following conditions:

  1. The type parameter is used only as a return type of interface methods and not used as a type of method arguments.
  2. The type parameter is not used as a generic constraint for the interface methods.
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The issue here, is that the return type of the createJobDao needs to be of type IJobDao<IJob> because this method can return many different implementations of the IJobDao, depending on the parameters passed into the method... so I need to cast object to the interface, rather than the implementation. –  Adam Levitt Dec 26 '12 at 3:30
    
Thanks for the continued help and patience. So if I add the covariant, then the method long insert(T job); on the IJobDao interface no longer works. See my above comment as well. –  Adam Levitt Dec 26 '12 at 3:36
    
I feel like this is so close... I'm just having the contravariant problem on using T as a method parameter now. –  Adam Levitt Dec 26 '12 at 3:38
1  
@AdamLevitt that's it)) –  horgh Dec 26 '12 at 3:40
1  
@AdamLevitt I don't know at least) –  horgh Dec 26 '12 at 3:41

Make IJobDao interface covariant:

public interface IJobDao<out T> where T : IJob
{
    T findById(long jobId);
}

Update:

You cannot have interface methods both returning and accepting generic values and make it covariant at the same time.

Possible solutions:

  • create a non-generic version of IJobDao<T> - IJobDao (of course, you'll have to implement both interfaces in classes, implementing IJobDao<T>)
  • split IJobDao<T> into 2 interfaces (one covariant and one contravariant)
  • consider a solution with only non-generic interface IJobDao (you are not getting any type-safety here anyway, which is the main purpose of generics)

Some ideas on implementing first scenario:

public interface IJobDao
{
    IJob findById(long jobId);

    long insert(IJob job);
}

public interface IJobDao<T> : IJobDao
    where T : IJob
{
    new T findById(long jobId);

    new long insert(T job);
}

public abstract class JobDaoBase<T> : IJobDao<T>, IJobDao
    where T : IJob
{
    public abstract T findById(long jobId);

    public abstract long insert(T job);

    IJob IJobDao.findById(long jobId)
    {
        return findById(jobId);
    }

    long IJobDao.insert(IJob job)
    {
        return insert((T)job);
    }
}

public class FullTimeJobDaoImpl : JobDaoBase<FullTimeJob>
{
    public override FullTimeJob findById(long jobId)
    {
        // implementation
    }

    public override long insert(FullTimeJob job)
    {
        // implementation
    }
}

// we are still unable to return generic interface, but we don't need to.
public static IJobDao createJobDao(/* my params */)
{
    object jobDao = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(FullTimeJobDaoImpl));
    return jobDao as IJobDao;
}
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Thanks for the answer. However, if I create a covariant, I get an error on the method in the IJobDao class on this method: long insert(T job); saying that the type parameter 'T' must be contravariantly valid. –  Adam Levitt Dec 26 '12 at 3:33
    
Added several possible solutions, each with its own drawbacks though. –  max Dec 26 '12 at 3:53

Consider using Inversion of Control approach with a container. The various implementations register themselves in the container. The resolver enquires please an instance of (x). See Unity as 1 of many IOC Container tools.

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