Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
gcc 4.7.2
c89

Hello,

#define LOG_ERR(fmt, ...)                                               \
    fprintf(stderr, "[ERROR] %s:%d: error [%s] " fmt "\n", __func__, __LINE__, strerror(errno), ##__VA_ARGS__)

And I am using it like this:

LOG_ERR("Failed to connect to message queue [ %d ]", msg_id);

The fmt has been concatenated in the fprintf statement. How is this possible?

I have tried to do the same with the following below just to test the concept, but failed with a compile error:

/* Using char array */
const char name[] = "Joe";

printf("Hello how " name " how are you today?\n");

Using constant string literal
const char *name = "Joe";

printf("Hello how " name " how are you today?\n");

Both game me the following error:

expected ')' before name

Many thanks for any suggestions,

share|improve this question
    
see this stackoverflow.com/questions/1383649/… –  MitziMeow Dec 26 '12 at 3:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When it fails, it's because you're using variables. String literals can be concatenated by the compiler i.e. if you write "abc" "123" then the compiler will treat this as "abc123". And when you do this in the macro, the preprocessor means that this is exactly what is sent to the compiler
LOG_ERR("Failed to connect to message queue [ %d ]", msg_id);
becomes
fprintf(stderr, "[ERROR] %s:%d: error [%s] " "Failed to connect to message queue [ %d ]" "\n", myfunction, 123, strerror(errno), msg_id);

Might be worth checking out the stringizer and concatenation macros too (for the preprocessor - # and ## and I never remember which is which...)

Andrew

share|improve this answer

You need a format specifier, check out the documentation for printf

const char *name = "Joe"; // or your char array, either's fine

printf("Hello how %s how are you today?\n", name);

Your attempt:

printf("Hello how " name " how are you today?\n");

Looks a little more C++ish

cout << "Hello how " << name << "are you today?\n";
share|improve this answer

Difference is that the macro is textually replacing the word fmt with your string. Putting two or more literal strings together gets you the concatenation of those strings.

"Hello " "World" "!!"
/* is the same as */
"Hello World!!"

Remember, only literal strings will do this. This does not work for variables.

Think of macros like a find/replace in your code. To illustrate, consider your macro definition -

#define LOG_ERR(fmt, ...)  \
    fprintf(stderr, "[ERROR] %s:%d: error [%s] " fmt "\n",
            __func__, __LINE__, strerror(errno), ##__VA_ARGS__)

When you use it like this -

LOG_ERR("Failed to connect to message queue [ %d ]", msg_id);

It does a textual replacement and becomes -

fprintf(stderr, "[ERROR] %s:%d: error [%s] " "Failed to connect to message queue [ %d ]" "\n",
            __func__, __LINE__, strerror(errno), msg_id)

The side-by-side strings and concatenated and voila -

fprintf(stderr, "[ERROR] %s:%d: error [%s] Failed to connect to message queue [ %d ]\n",
            __func__, __LINE__, strerror(errno), msg_id)
share|improve this answer

If you want to define a macro for fprintf() you may do like this which is simplest IMHO.

#define LOG_ERR(...) fprintf(stderr, __VA_ARGS__)

and use it like

int main() {

int  myVar =100;

LOG_ERR ("The value of myVar is %d", myVar); 

return 0; 

}

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.